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  1. Get up early. We mean really early. Head to the backside to watch morning training and then watch some works from the front side after the break. Make sure you grab your coffee and copy of the Saratoga Special newspaper at the Morning Line. It’s even money you’ll see the West Point team and Partners.
  2. Attend a concert or show at SPAC. NYC Ballet, Philadelphia Orchestra, Janet Jackson, Chicago, Dierks Bentley, Luke Bryan, Godsmack, Penatonix, Chris Stapleton, and more!
     
  3. Watch a race with the West Point team at the “big screen” then have drinks at the famous paddock bar. Grab fries and a shake from Shake Shack while you’re at it.
     
  4. Tour the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame.
     
  5. Join track announcer Larry Collmus in the booth for the third race call and support backstretch workers.
     
  6. Take the scenic drive to Manchester, Vermont and enjoy outlet shopping, hiking, and fly fishing. Be sure to check out the Orvis Store.
     
  7. Play a round of golf and/or have dinner at Saratoga National.
     
  8. Have a delicious Italian dinner at Pennell’s, WPT’s favorite spot. On the topic of food, my favorite breakfast spot is Sweet Mimi’s.
     
  9. Catch a polo match on Friday or Sunday evenings throughout the meet.
     
  10. Attend the Fasig-Tipton select yearling sale held August 6 and 7. This is a must do if you’re in town then -- it’s a huge social event a ton of fun.
     
  11. Visit Lake George. Hike Buck Mountain and enjoy a beautiful view of the lake and Adirondacks. Or try ziplining!
     
  12. Get an after-dinner ice cream cone at Dairy Haus. It’s homemade and the best!
     
  13. Have an after-dinner drink at Sperry’s downtown.
     
  14. Explore downtown Saratoga with a stroll down Broadway. Walk through Saratoga State Park or Congress Park. Stroll down Beekman Street in Saratoga's Art District and pop into Taverna Novo -- say hi to Patty & Jeff and enjoy some amazing pizza. Check out the newly reopened Adelphi Hotel and their bar -- Morrissey’s.
     
  15. Rent a boat and spend a Tuesday afternoon on Saratoga Lake. There’s a good chance you’ll see Dallas Stewart in his bright yellow watercraft.
     
  16. Walk along the path from the winner’s circle to the jocks room after a race to hear the most insane excuses jockeys give to trainers and trainers give to owners. Have one of the jocks sign your program. Get a pair of dirty goggles for the kiddos.
     
  17. Arrive at the track early on Thursdays and watch the steeplechase races to get your heart pumping out of your chest.
     
  18. Enjoy a casual day at the track in the backyard picnic area. Wear shorts and a t-shirt and bring your cooler, lawn chair, and picnic basket.
     
  19. Join Larry Collmus in exclaiming “And they’re off at Saratoga” on Friday, July 20. This tradition was started by the one and only Tom Durkin.
     
  20. After morning training head to the Spring Street Deli. There’s a good chance you’ll see Dale Romans. Impress him by ordering the “Shackleford” sandwich.
     
  21. Watch a race from the backstretch. Seven-furlong races are really cool because you’ll see the horses break just feet from the rail.
     
  22. Book a trip to go white water rafting.
     
  23. Visit Saratoga’s famous mineral springs. Bathe in the mineral water at Roosevelt Baths. Get a massage while there too.
     
  24. Visit Old Friends Cabin Creek and spend time with some really cool retired Thoroughbreds, including our beloved King Congie. A fun event in support of Old Friends is held August 5 at the Saratoga National Golf Club.
     
  25. Attend the Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation’s Hay, Oats, and Spaghetti Fundraiser on July 23 and the Equine Advocates Annual Gala on August 2 at Canfield Casino. Terry Finley is being honored for his response to stranded Thoroughbreds in Puerto Rico and commitment to Thoroughbred retirement.
     
6
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DLenert
Aug 2 2017 - 8:09am
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/news-and-blog/blog/2018/06/27/25-things-to-do-in-saratoga-this-summer
9 am on June 27, 2018
  1. Get up early. We mean really early. Head to the backside to watch morning training and then watch some works from the front side after the break. Make sure you grab your coffee and copy of the Saratoga Special newspaper at the Morning Line. It’s even money you’ll see the West Point team and Partners.
EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618

This is the final segment of our series highlighting the group of young professionals who own Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf contender Best Performance.


Learn more about West Point Thoroughbreds’ Young Professionals Initiative by reading Part 1 (Jonathan Villa), Part 2 (Chris Arroyo), Part 3 (Kendra Potasiewicz), and part 4 (Chris Barber).

 

Read Breeders’ Cup feature on West Point Thoroughbreds’ Young Professionals Initiative.

 

Next up is Taylor Bassett from Syracuse, New York.


1.) How did you become a racing fan?

 

For as long as I can remember, my father brought me to the races at Saratoga during the summer. My real love for racing came from watching the horses in the morning. Morning workouts at Saratoga will make any casual track goer a fan for life. There are few things in life better than watching horses gallop, drinking a coffee and watching the sunrise. Now, I am a huge fan of the sport. I continue to learn more and more every day.

 

2.) What made you decide you wanted to be a racehorse owner?

 

My grandfather and my uncle have been partners with West Point for several years. I have been a competitive person my whole life having played college basketball. After college was over, I needed to find a hobby that fulfilled the excitement and competitiveness that college basketball could no longer provide. I was watching races, handicapping daily, researching pedigrees and attending horse sales. I liked a few horses West Point bought at the yearling sales and decided to get involved with my grandfather and uncle. Joe Migliore later reached out to me regarding the Young Professionals Initiative, and I thought it offered great value and thought I would give that a shot as well. Now I’m involved with seven West Point runners.

 

3. What do your friends/family think of your “investment”?

 

My friends and family always ask when my horses are running and want updates and pictures. People tend to ask a lot of questions about the sport because they don’t know much. It’s great to be able to help explain to people the ownership side of racing and hopefully encourage someone to visit the track.

 

4.) What advice would you give to other young people looking to get involved?

 

You don’t need a lot of money to get started. The finances are designed in a way that makes it very easy to go from fan to owner. West Point’s management and hospitality are very welcoming, especially for new young owners. There is nothing more exciting than being at the track and rooting for one of your horses down the stretch.

 

5.) How does it feel to have a horse pointing for the Breeders’ Cup?

 

I am 24 years old and I have not one, but two horses pointed for the Breeders Cup. If you would have told me that a year ago, I would have called you crazy. To have two babies competing in the most prestigious juvenile races in the world is surreal to me. I already had plans to attend the Breeders’ Cup as a fan, but I will have to pack a jacket and pants because now I’m going as an owner!

MORE ABOUT YOUNG PROFESSIONALS OWNERSHIP

 

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EFinley
Nov 1 2017 - 11:24am
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11 am on November 01, 2017

This is the final segment of our series highlighting the group of young professionals who own Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf contender Best Performance.


Learn more about West Point Thoroughbreds’ Young Professionals Initiative by reading Part 1 (Jonathan Villa), Part 2 (Chris Arroyo), Part 3 (Kendra Potasiewicz), and part 4 (Chris Barber).

 

Read Breeders’ Cup feature on West Point Thoroughbreds’ Young Professionals Initiative.

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618

I’m flying over the Rocky Mountains as I pen this blog -- on my way out to Breeders’ Cup 2017. I couldn’t help but think about our Breeders’ Cup runners from years past.


Our first BC starter was with Ethan Man at Santa Anita in the Sprint. He came into the race off a second place finish in the Phoenix at Keeneland. I remember the incredible rush I felt when they loaded into the gate. Unfortunately, the colt was injured in the race, and the Sprint ended up being the last start of his career.

 

Our big year in terms of starters was in 2007 at Monmouth Park. We had five runners ten years ago -- two favorites, two mid-priced horses, and then the second longest shot on the board in the Classic. If you remember, that weekend was a quagmire on the Jersey Shore.


Both favorites were fillies - Dream Rush and Lear’s Princess. Neither of them took to the slop and were nonfactors.  


The longest shot in our group (at 28.30-1) was a little 4-year-old gelding named Awesome Gem. He was coming off three straight near misses in California for Craig Dollase and while we didn’t know it when the sprung the latch, ended up loving the slop. Later in his career, he’d win the Hawthorne Gold Cup in a monsoon.


I remember feeling pretty deflated after our two favorites didn’t fire, and our horse in the race before the Classic finished last. It was up to our longshot to brighten the day...


So he’s in with a bunch of really nice horses -- a Derby winner,  a Preakness winner, and a King’s Bishop winner.


Curlin powers to a win, Hard Spun is second, and approaching the wire Street Sense (that year’s Kentucky Derby winner) is working hard to keep third.  


Our gelding had another plan on his mind.


David Flores came running and closes with a rush to get up for third in the shadow of the wire with Awesome Gem.


It was the first time we hit the board in a Breeders’ Cup race. It was pretty emotional to run so well in the Breeders’ Cup Classic at the track I worked at as a kid.


“Gemster” went on to have an amazing career, notching a grade one win in the Hollywood Gold Cup and competing in three more Breeders’ Cups before finally retiring at the ripe old age of nine after earning almost $3 million. He’s now living the life of Riley at Old Friends in Kentucky.


West Point owes that old gelding so much.


The ten years since Monmouth have gone by too quickly. We’ve never had a 2-year-old in the Breeders’ Cup until this year. We’re heading to Del Mar with two live shots and are ready to make new memories.



Me and my family at Breeders’ Cup 2007 at Monmouth

 

Screen Shot 2017-10-30 at 3.30.16 PM.png

Awesome Gem at Old Friends in Kentucky (Laura Battles photo)

1
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JRitota
Oct 30 2017 - 6:13pm
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121139
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3 pm on October 30, 2017

I’m flying over the Rocky Mountains as I pen this blog -- on my way out to Breeders’ Cup 2017. I couldn’t help but think about our Breeders’ Cup runners from years past.


Our first BC starter was with Ethan Man at Santa Anita in the Sprint. He came into the race off a second place finish in the Phoenix at Keeneland. I remember the incredible rush I felt when they loaded into the gate. Unfortunately, the colt was injured in the race, and the Sprint ended up being the last start of his career.

tfinley
tfinley's picture
43

This is part four of our series highlighting the group of young professionals who own Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf contender Best Performance.


Learn more about West Point Thoroughbreds’ Young Professionals Initiative by reading Part 1 (Jonathan Villa), Part 2 (Chris Arroyo), and Part 3 (Kendra Potasiewicz)


Read Breeders’ Cup feature on West Point Thoroughbreds’ Young Professionals Initiative.

 

Next up is Chris Barber, associate director of the Ford Foundation.

 

1.) How did you become a racing fan?


I happened to turn on the national TV broadcast of the Sunday Silence vs. Easy Goer Kentucky Derby. Like many fans, I was totally captivated by the series of races between those two horses. I remember having my next birthday party at Golden Gate Fields, our local Northern California track.

2.) What made you decide you wanted to be a racehorse owner?


I wanted a better view into the planning and preparation that goes into every race. This has been fascinating to watch firsthand. As an owner, you see the entire process and gain a new appreciation for the countless hours devoted to breeding, training, grooming, etc. All to win a two-minute race.


3.) What do your friends/family think of your “investment”?


They think it's super exciting...and a tiny bit crazy!

4.) What advice would you give to other young people looking to get involved?


Take the opportunity to learn as much as possible. The many articles on West Point's website are a great resource for learning about the business side of thoroughbred racing.

5.) How does it feel to have a horse pointing for the Breeders’ Cup?

In a word, grateful! Many owners wait years and invest millions before having a horse like Best Performance, so I'm not taking it for granted.

MORE ABOUT YOUNG PROFESSIONALS OWNERSHIP

Barber at Saratoga this summer

With jockey Jose Ortiz

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EFinley
Oct 30 2017 - 10:43am
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10 am on October 30, 2017

This is part four of our series highlighting the group of young professionals who own Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf contender Best Performance.


Learn more about West Point Thoroughbreds’ Young Professionals Initiative by reading Part 1 (Jonathan Villa), Part 2 (Chris Arroyo), and Part 3 (Kendra Potasiewicz)

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618

This is part three of our series highlighting the group of young professionals who own Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf contender Best Performance.


Learn more about West Point Thoroughbreds’ Young Professionals Initiative by reading Part 1 (Jonathan Villa) and Part 2 (Chris Arroyo) of the series.

 

MORE ABOUT YOUNG PROFESSIONALS OWNERSHIP

 

Next up is Kendra Potasiewicz, a sales engineer who resides in Saratoga.


1.) How did you become a racing fan?
 

My love of horses is what drew me to racing. I was "horse-crazy" from a young age and started riding when I was 11. When I was 12 my parents bought me my first horse, a 4-year-old Florida-bred OTTB - he was a great horse, and we had a lot of fun together. My family always had horses, and I showed Quarter Horses until I aged out of the youth division, then came college and my career, and horses were no longer a focal point in my life. Relocating to Saratoga Springs in 2014 reignited my love for horses, and subsequently the racing game. The strategies that go into every decision - from purchasing, to training, to picking appropriate races and getting the right fit in a rider - are all very intriguing.


2.) What made you decide you wanted to be a racehorse owner?


If you love horses and live in this town (Saratoga Springs), it's almost a natural progression to want to become an owner. I knew at some point in my life that I wanted to have a racehorse, but didn't think it was feasible right now. When I learned about the YPI, I knew it was the kind of opportunity that I couldn't pass up. Also, thoroughbred aftercare is a cause I'm very interested in and intend to become more involved with. By becoming an owner and learning more about the industry as a whole, I hope to use that knowledge to assist aftercare organizations and advocate for our runners once they're ready for their second career. I also felt that by joining WP I was aligning myself with an ethical group of people, who were industry leaders and staunch equine advocates.

3.) What do your friends/family think of your “investment”?

 

They were all for it!

4.) What advice would you give to other young people looking to get involved?

 

Don't think that ownership is out of reach - if you are even the slightest bit interested in becoming an owner, reach out to WP. Ask questions, get to know other partners, participate in the events that WP organizes and go to as many workouts and races as possible - your ownership journey is what you make of it.

5.) How does it feel to have a horse pointing for the Breeders’ Cup?

 

I was ecstatic just to get a photo this year (in BP’s maiden debut), and now to have her pointed for Breeders' Cup, it's incredible! I don't know if it's beginners luck or what, but I'm making sure to enjoy every moment and not take for granted what a feat it is to be in this prestigious race.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
Read/Write
EFinley
Oct 25 2017 - 1:28pm
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121020
/news-and-blog/blog/2017/10/25/part-3-young-professionals-heading-to-breeders-cup
1 pm on October 25, 2017

This is part three of our series highlighting the group of young professionals who own Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf contender Best Performance.


Learn more about West Point Thoroughbreds’ Young Professionals Initiative by reading Part 1 (Jonathan Villa) and Part 2 (Chris Arroyo) of the series.

 

MORE ABOUT YOUNG PROFESSIONALS OWNERSHIP

 

Next up is Kendra Potasiewicz, a sales engineer who resides in Saratoga.

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618

Over 200 West Point Partners are coming to this year’s Breeders’ Cup at Del Mar to cheer on Best Performance and Untamed Domain. That’s an unbelievable number and a testament to the passion and excitement our owners have for the sport!


Included in our group are a number of new Partners. We’re fanatical about growing the game and love seeing fresh faces in the ownership ranks!


This summer West Point Thoroughbreds' first ever Young Professionals Initiative (YPI) was created by its own team of young professionals to give the "under 40" crowd the opportunity to get involved in a group of high potential racehorses for a modest investment.


Each Young Professional in the ownership group owns a percentage of five West Point 2-year-olds, and hit the jackpot right out of the gate. One of those horses is the graded stakes-placed filly Best Performance. Trained by Christophe Clement, the filly is a live contender in the $1,000,000 Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies Turf (G1) run on Friday, November 3 at Del Mar.

 

Hearing their stories, horse racing passion is alive and well among the younger generation. Their racing interest was sparked at a young age by a family member or a television introduction. Their newly opened door to this lifestyle to date is beyond their wildest dreams, and they aren't taking any of this success for granted. They YPIs did their homework before joining the ownership ranks. They know many owners wait years and spend millions to get a quality horse like Best Performance and they are ecstatic about competing in such a prestigious race.


In the days leading up to the Breeders’ Cup, we’ll highlight members of this special ownership group.

 

Read part 1 of this blog, in which Jonathan Villa, a social studies teacher from New York, shares his ownership story.

 

Next up is Chris Arroyo, a young professional from New Jersey who worked in the finance industry.


If you’re a young person who thinks you’d never be able to afford a racehorse, think again!

 

MORE ABOUT YOUNG PROFESSIONALS OWNERSHIP



Chris Arroyo:

 

1.) How did you become a racing fan?

 

I got into racing by going to Monmouth Park when I was younger with my dad and reading the PPs with him.

 

2.) What made you decide you wanted to be a racehorse owner?


I've known a former West Point owner for most of my life, and he showed me all of the work that goes into just the races. All of the different details and the hard work just to get to a race really drew me into racing. I got to go in the paddock when I was younger and always knew that I wanted to be there myself when I was older.

 

3.) What do your friends/family think of your “investment”?


My Mom thought I was crazy for buying into horses when I was 23 rather than saving but she also didn't realize how much of a passion and dream it was for me. Now I can't keep her away from the races; she loves the family feel we get every time we're at the track with the WPT team and all of the other Partners. And all of my friends all want updates on the horses and to come to the races...and the Breeders’ Cup Best Performance swag.

4.) What advice would you give to other young people looking to get involved?

 

Obviously, as most will tell you, don't expect a financial return but get into it because you love the sport. Even if it's not your biggest passion, I feel really comfortable in saying that you're going to fall in love with the horses, the sport, and the people. You'll never believe the people you'll meet from all walks of life and how much fun everyone is having while we're enjoying the races.

5.) How does it feel to have a horse pointing for the Breeders’ Cup?

 

You always see the horses that make it big time but know it's such a small and special shot being in such prestigious races. I can't tell you how excited my family, friends, and I are for this race. It's such an incredible feeling and special feeling that I never imagined I would get to experience.

 
 
 
Chris with legendary track announcer Tom Durkin
 
In the paddock at Saratoga
 
Spending time with Cullum Road, his 2-year-old by Quality Road
Read/Write
admin
Oct 31 2017 - 3:00pm
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/news-and-blog/blog/2017/10/23/part-2-young-professionals-ownership-group-heading-to-breeders-cup
1 pm on October 23, 2017

Over 200 West Point Partners are coming to this year’s Breeders’ Cup at Del Mar to cheer on Best Performance and Untamed Domain. That’s an unbelievable number and a testament to the passion and excitement our owners have for the sport!


Included in our group are a number of new Partners. We’re fanatical about growing the game and love seeing fresh faces in the ownership ranks!


This summer West Point Thoroughbreds' first ever Young Professionals Initiative (YPI) was created by its own team of young professionals to give the "under 40" crowd the opportunity to get involved in a group of high potential racehorses for a modest investment.

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618

Over 200 West Point Partners are coming to this year’s Breeders’ Cup at Del Mar to cheer on Best Performance and Untamed Domain. That’s an unbelievable number and a testament to the passion and excitement our owners have for the sport!


Included in our group are a number of new Partners. We’re fanatical about growing the game and love seeing fresh faces in the ownership ranks!


This summer West Point Thoroughbreds' first ever Young Professionals Initiative (YPI) was created by its own team of young professionals to give the "under 40" crowd the opportunity to get involved in a group of high potential racehorses for a modest investment.

Each Young Professional in the ownership group owns a percentage of five West Point 2-year-olds, and hit the jackpot right out of the gate. One of those horses is the graded stakes-placed filly Best Performance. Trained by Christophe Clement, the filly is a live contender in the $1,000,000 Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies Turf (G1) run on Friday, November 3 at Del Mar.

 

Hearing their stories, horse racing passion is alive and well among the younger generation. Their racing interest was sparked at a young age by a family member or a television introduction. Their newly opened door to this lifestyle to date is beyond their wildest dreams, and they aren't taking any of this success for granted. They YPIs did their homework before joining the ownership ranks. They know many owners wait years and spend millions to get a quality horse like Best Performance and they are ecstatic about competing in such a prestigious race.


In the days leading up to the Breeders’ Cup, we’ll highlight members of this special ownership group.

 

Read part 1 of this blog, in which Jonathan Villa, a social studies teacher from New York, shares his ownership story.

 

Next up is Chris Arroyo, a young professional from New Jersey who worked in the finance industry.


If you’re a young person who thinks you’d never be able to afford a racehorse, think again!

 

MORE ABOUT YOUNG PROFESSIONALS OWNERSHIP



Chris Arroyo:

 

1.) How did you become a racing fan?

 

I got into racing by going to Monmouth Park when I was younger with my dad and reading the PPs with him.

 

2.) What made you decide you wanted to be a racehorse owner?


I've known a former West Point owner for most of my life, and he showed me all of the work that goes into just the races. All of the different details and the hard work just to get to a race really drew me into racing. I got to go in the paddock when I was younger and always knew that I wanted to be there myself when I was older.

 

3.) What do your friends/family think of your “investment”?


My Mom thought I was crazy for buying into horses when I was 23 rather than saving but she also didn't realize how much of a passion and dream it was for me. Now I can't keep her away from the races; she loves the family feel we get every time we're at the track with the WPT team and all of the other Partners. And all of my friends all want updates on the horses and to come to the races...and the Breeders’ Cup Best Performance swag.

4.) What advice would you give to other young people looking to get involved?

 

Obviously, as most will tell you, don't expect a financial return but get into it because you love the sport. Even if it's not your biggest passion, I feel really comfortable in saying that you're going to fall in love with the horses, the sport, and the people. You'll never believe the people you'll meet from all walks of life and how much fun everyone is having while we're enjoying the races.

5.) How does it feel to have a horse pointing for the Breeders’ Cup?

 

You always see the horses that make it big time but know it's such a small and special shot being in such prestigious races. I can't tell you how excited my family, friends, and I are for this race. It's such an incredible feeling and special feeling that I never imagined I would get to experience.

 
 
 
Chris with legendary track announcer Tom Durkin
 
In the paddock at Saratoga
 
Spending time with Cullum Road, his 2-year-old by Quality Road
Read/Write
admin
Oct 31 2017 - 3:20pm
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12 pm on October 20, 2017

Over 200 West Point Partners are coming to this year’s Breeders’ Cup at Del Mar to cheer on Best Performance and Untamed Domain. That’s an unbelievable number and a testament to the passion and excitement our owners have for the sport!


Included in our group are a number of new Partners. We’re fanatical about growing the game and love seeing fresh faces in the ownership ranks!


This summer West Point Thoroughbreds' first ever Young Professionals Initiative (YPI) was created by its own team of young professionals to give the "under 40" crowd the opportunity to get involved in a group of high potential racehorses for a modest investment.

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618

An incredible day yesterday at Equestricon here in Saratoga Springs. This convention is rocking.  


Great energy, many faces (new and some not so new!!) coming together to celebrate racing and discuss how to make things better.


Last year in early August, I had a chance meeting with the three young organizers of Equestricon: Kathryn Sharp, Justin Nicholson, and Dan Tordjman.They quickly cornered me and started describing their dream of holding this convention. I remember thinking  “this seems like a great idea, but man will it take a lot of heavy lifting”.


Fast forward 12 months and that heavy lifting has been done (most by three talented, smart and passionate racing junkies).Take a look at their website and Twitter feed.

 

Last night I had a chance to watch “The First Saturday In May” movie which covered horses competing on the 2006 Derby trail. The Hennegan Brothers did the movie and followed up around all spring.  What wonderful memories it brought back since we had Flashy Bull that year.


We ran in the Derby but did not run well and ended up 14th. Our story did not make the film (we ended up on the cutting room floor). But, I did get three-second spot talking to our trainer Kiaran McLaughlin on Derby Morning.

 

Speaking of the Derby, I want to share a cool moment I shared with Hall of Fame jockey Pat Day yesterday. We were chatting and I asked him how often he thinks about his Derby win (in 1992 aboard Lil E. Tee). Since it’s been 25 years since his Derby win I expected him to say the memory’s kinda faded away. Nope. He responded, “I think about it every single day”.

 

Here is a photo of the Q & A from last night’s movie. Most of the main characters (including Dale Romans on his birthday and son Jake) came back to talk about the process:

 

 

Alabama week coming up at the Spa which means we are past the halfway point! The days need to slow down!!

Me in a virtual reality race on a horse at Woodbine ridden by Emma Jayne Wilson:

 

2
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Gwen L Davis (not verified)
Aug 17 2017 - 3:01pm
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119778
/news-and-blog/blog/2017/08/15/terrys-blog-monday-at-equestricon
12 pm on August 15, 2017

An incredible day yesterday at Equestricon here in Saratoga Springs. This convention is rocking.  


Great energy, many faces (new and some not so new!!) coming together to celebrate racing and discuss how to make things better.

tfinley
tfinley's picture
43

A fascinating read about a jockey's fall at the starting gate. Dean Butler is a longtime friend who rode in the Mid-Atlantic for many years. He's in the twilight of his career now but has spent several decades in the middle rungs of the jockey colonies around the country.

 

I had to smile after reading this and viewing the photos - no doubt the trainer of this horse told Dean to be on the lead going into the first turn!

 

Early on in our company's existence, I vowed we'd rarely affix blame to a jockey for a loss.  It’s simple, stuff happens. This stance has helped us through the years.

 

Think about the risk faced by riders every time they are legged up in the paddock. The toughest and most dangerous job in professional sports -- being a jockey.

 

Enjoy the read.

Read/Write
EFinley
Jul 3 2017 - 12:23pm
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119106
/news-and-blog/blog/2017/07/03/terrys-blog-the-toughest-job-in-sports
12 pm on July 03, 2017

A fascinating read about a jockey's fall at the starting gate. Dean Butler is a longtime friend who rode in the Mid-Atlantic for many years. He's in the twilight of his career now but has spent several decades in the middle rungs of the jockey colonies around the country.

 

I had to smile after reading this and viewing the photos - no doubt the trainer of this horse told Dean to be on the lead going into the first turn!

tfinley
tfinley's picture
43

Wow, what an amazing five weeks since the Derby. It seems like five days ago we were eating White Castle hamburgers in the Aloft Hotel after Always Dreaming won.  

 

As happens every year, the composition of the Belmont field is entirely different (save two horses) from the 20 horses that loaded up into the Kentucky Derby gate on the first Saturday in May.

 

I had dinner the other night at Don Pepe’s - the famous Italian restaurant outside the Aqueduct gate and one of the best restaurants in NYC.  Here’s a tip - ask the owner about his bird racing operation.  20 minutes later your eyes will be glazed over, but you may get dessert and a glass of wine - on the house.

 

Dallas Stewart joined us at Don Pepe’s. He’s running Hollywood Handsome in the Belmont.  Here’s another tip --  don’t leave Dallas’ horse off your exotics.  He’s done it before, and he might do it again this weekend.  It’s simply awesome to be around a person so excited and passionate about what he does for a living - that’s Dallas.

 

Here’s an assignment for you -- tell a friend or business associate about our great game. Invite them to the races this summer.  Together we’ll make this game better!

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JVilla
Jun 10 2017 - 7:27pm
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/news-and-blog/blog/2017/06/09/terrys-blog-belmont-week
11 am on June 09, 2017

Wow, what an amazing five weeks since the Derby. It seems like five days ago we were eating White Castle hamburgers in the Aloft Hotel after Always Dreaming won.  

 

As happens every year, the composition of the Belmont field is entirely different (save two horses) from the 20 horses that loaded up into the Kentucky Derby gate on the first Saturday in May.

tfinley
tfinley's picture
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