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WPT Partners are locked and loaded for a fun opening week at the two premier summer meets--Del Mar and Saratoga.

Jeff Lifson arrived in sunny San Diego yesterday and saw the Dollase runners after they settled in at their summer base. Jeff tweeted some photos of them, click here to visit WPT on Twitter.

Terry, Debbie, and Erin Finley are en route to the “Spa” this afternoon.  Tom Bellhouse and Lindsey Heumann live in Saratoga year round. Aren’t they lucky!


Mr. Candy Bar kicks things off Wednesday afternoon in a 1 1/16 mile turf event at Del Mar. A two-time winner, our son of Candy Ride (Arg) is making his first start “where the turf meets the surf” for trainer OJ Jauregui.

On the East Coast, first 2012 juvenile West Point starter debuts on Friday at Saratoga. Toasting (pictured right), a 2-year-old daughter of Congrats was one of the fillies we had to have at the OBS March Sale and has been training forwardly for Tom Albertrani. Take a look at a video of her by clicking here.

Saturday should be an action packed day for Partners. Suns Out Guns Out, Bellamy, and Half Nelson will pass through the entry box on Wednesday and hopefully draw in.

Suns Out Guns Out is out to break his maiden for trainer Dale Romans after several solid efforts earlier in the year at Gulfstream.

Tom Albertrani trainee Bellamy is set to go postward for the second time on Saturday in a NY-bred maiden special weight on the turf. A strapping son of Bellamy, he should love the grass and a stretch out in distance.

The grey Half Nelson has hit the board in all five career starts. He’s set to compete in a NY-bred first level allowance as part of the opening weekend festivities.

Graham Motion trainee Gold Megillah is set to return to action in Sunday’s Duluth Stakes at Saratoga. A 3-year-old son of Purim, Gold Megillah had a solid spring finishing third in the Rushaway Stakes and fourth in the Lexington Stakes at Keeneland.

Good luck to all runners and their Partners this weekend! Click here to see race details for all runners.

Partners....Be sure to visit MYWPT for information on backstretch tours, raceday protocol, ticketing, restaurants, hotels, etc.

Check back regularly for blogs, updates, and videos from both coasts!

 

Top photo by Adam Coglianese


 

2
Disabled
DLenert
Jul 18 2012 - 9:15am
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91172
/news-and-blog/blog/2012/07/17/wpt-runners-locked-and-loaded-for-summer-meets
4 pm on July 17, 2012

WPT Partners are locked and loaded for a fun opening week at the two premier summer meets--Del Mar and Saratoga.

Jeff Lifson arrived in sunny San Diego yesterday and saw the Dollase runners after they settled in at their summer base. Jeff tweeted some photos of them, click here to visit WPT on Twitter.

Terry, Debbie, and Erin Finley are en route to the “Spa” this afternoon.  Tom Bellhouse and Lindsey Heumann live in Saratoga year round. Aren’t they lucky!

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618

The premier summer meets-- Saratoga and Del Mar are upon us. WPT Partners are locked and loaded with several 2-year-olds scheduled to make their debuts.

As you make summer plans and gear up for the meets, I wanted to make you aware of some important changes going on at both tracks that will impact WPT and every other owner with juveniles ready to go.

Am I in favor of the changes? Yes.  

Like with anything there are pros and cons.


Summary of 2-Year-Old Race Changes:

-Sprint races at Saratoga limited to eight starters.
-Two-turn races at Saratoga limited to 10 starters.
Previously, NYRA allowed as many as 14 horses to run in a juvenile maiden sprint- say what?????
-Both sprint and two-turn races limited to 10 starters at Del Mar.

Pros

-Cleaner run races. I remember last year standing at the big screen watching a 14-horse maiden race and it was almost painful to watch. A good number of 2-year-olds can’t break from the gate straight no matter how schooled they are! Some roughness is inevitable in baby races, but you’ve got a helluva better shot to have a clean race with eight than you do with 14!

-Better ability to evaluate your horse’s performance. You don’t learn very much about your horse if he finishes seventh in a field of 13, but if you finish seventh of eight, chances are he either needed the race or isn’t as good as you thought he was. We want 2-year-olds to grow and develop, not lose confidence in a cattle charge.

Trainer Bob Baffert- "I have been trying to get Del Mar to do it for years. It's a great idea. Young horses can't develop as well in large fields."

-Enhanced stakes program. There can only be one winner. With shorter fields, there will be more races, and more winners. It makes it easier for us to get our Partners to the winner’s circle. More horses will have the experience they need to take the next step which can mean more stakes action for owners.

-Shorter fields = more races = more positive education for young horses.

Cons

-While there will inevitably be more juvenile races, it will make it more difficult to plan ahead. We’re pointing Toasting, our 2-year-old filly by Congrats to a maiden race on opening day at Saratoga. The chances of the race overfilling--pretty good, so if we get unlucky her debut will be pushed back a few days. We know this makes it tough for Partners to make arrangements. Frustrating, but out of our control.

-Altered training schedules if you don’t draw into a race is another downside. If your horse works five days out, then you’re sitting on go, and if you get excluded, it’s not the ideal situation. It’s a reality of racing we all face though.

 



The bottom line is Partners will benefit from being flexible and embracing the understanding that their horses are more likely to be excluded from races than in the past. Everyone who desires to compete in these premier meets is in the same boat.

I suggest using Southwest Airlines if possible! They fly into San Diego and Albany, and have liberal ticket policies without change fees. I also recommend Priceline for last minute hotel bookings.

I welcome your thoughts.

What do you think about the changes?

Terry

17
Disabled
DLenert
Jul 21 2012 - 7:35am
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91127
/news-and-blog/blog/2012/07/12/terrys-notes-saratoga-del-mar-adjust-2yo-field-sizes
1 pm on July 12, 2012

The premier summer meets-- Saratoga and Del Mar are upon us. WPT Partners are locked and loaded with several 2-year-olds scheduled to make their debuts.

As you make summer plans and gear up for the meets, I wanted to make you aware of some important changes going on at both tracks that will impact WPT and every other owner with juveniles ready to go.

Am I in favor of the changes? Yes.  

Like with anything there are pros and cons.

tfinley
tfinley's picture
43

Jeff Lifson (or “Liffy,” as he’s lovingly known) is West Point Thoroughbreds’ Executive Vice President of Sales and Operations. He joined WPT as a staff member in 2004 and currently resides in Louisville, Ky. with his wife, Louisville native Stephanie Collins, and their two children –  Amanda and Josh.

Jeff is an Iowa native who graduated from Williams College with a BA in History (1986) and of Northwestern University with a Masters in Journalism (1989). He also made money in high school and college de-tasseling corn, was a ballet dancer for a good portion of his youth (from about 8-16 years old), played rugby in the scrum at Williams and escaped with his face and bone structure pretty much intact, and sang at Williams in a traveling singing group called the Springstreeters – the closest he ever got to living the life of a performer.


Q. How did you get interested in Thoroughbred Racing?
A. I moved to Louisville in 1994 from Kalamazoo, Mich. If you know anything about racing, you know Kalamazoo is not a hotbed. I was working as an anchorman and reporter for WHAS-TV and when you live in Louisville and your station happens to carry the Derby it’s sink or swim, embrace or deny. Either you get involved with what’s happening in your backyard on the first Saturday in May, or you take a vacation. I was given the opportunity to cover racing and I jumped at the chance - I tell people I got into racing at the penthouse level, not the bottom floor.    

Q. Where’s your favorite racetrack?

A. I really don’t think I have a favorite track. I loved the old Gulfstream, I love the new Gulfstream. Keeneland and Churchill and Del Mar and Saratoga and Santa Anita and Belmont and Arlington are all places I love to be. The paddock at Delaware Park is just spectacular and it’s a mainline track but many of our Partners have never been there. Woodbine is great, too. What a facility, and they treat owners extremely well. Also, their buffet is beyond good. But I guess if I had to pick one, Churchill is home.


Q. So your favorite racing event is the Kentucky Derby.
A. Absolutely. Let’s say some aliens from some planet outside earth are dropped in for the day, and they’re racing fans, and they’re dropped in on a number of tracks for big events, including Churchill Downs on Derby Day - how are they not going to think, “Now that’s the way to do this.”


Q. Who is your favorite Derby winner?
A. The horse from the year of my birth - Northern Dancer, 1964. While there are no bad Derby winners, some are more obscure than others, but he almost took the Triple Crown and set the track record that stood until Secretariat and went on to be an influential stallion.

Q. Can you share a few “inside angles” for handicapping at Churchill?
A. If they stunk at Keeneland, take a second look at them at Churchill. They’re two dramatically different tracks and the turf courses are different, too.

Q. Tell us about a horse you’ve owned in partnership with WPT.
A. The best was our two-time Grade 1 winner Dream Rush, she was very classy. I remember when she sold at Fasig-Tipton and she walked in and did that head turn that the good horses do, checking everything out. She just stepped in, set herself almost perfectly, did the head turn, and pretty much said “I know you’ve been waiting for me, here I am.” She was the run of a lifetime. Thankfully I’ve been around some serious racehorses, Grade 1 winners, Derby Starters, and our millionaire Awesome Gem. But Dream Rush was a thrill to be involved with - I don’t think there’s been a more flat-out, talented, drill-you-into-the-ground speed horse in our stable.

 

Dream Rush winning the 2007 Darley Test (G1)

 

Q. Who are your favorite current WPT runners?
A. King Ting - he’s just a hard-trying horse that had an awful start to his career and he’s come back to be a very useful horse - and Belle of the Hall. How can you not love her? She was drop-dead gorgeous the moment we first saw her, like Audrey Hepburn.

Q. What’s your philosophy on owning race horses?
A. It’s not for everyone, but it is for someone who wants some incredible experiences and a few amazing stories to tell.


Q. What’s the best part about being involved with WPT?
A. My clients make this job worthwhile. Talking on the phone about a breakthrough one of our horses took, or enjoying dinner after a big stakes win is such a great experience with clients who become, in time, great friends.

 
I also love the fact that our clients seek to achieve the fullest experience possible. And that means spending time with us at the sales and at the earliest stages of training for our horses. It’s part of the journey.

Q. What keeps you going through the ups and downs of racing?
A. Drugs (laughs). Seriously, my family keeps me sane. It’s good to have family around with a lot of other pursuits you can dive into outside of the racetrack, and they keep me well-rounded.

Q. Anything else you’d like to tell the folks?
A. If you’re looking for any deep, dark secrets on Tom Bellhouse, I’m your go-to guy.

 

Jeff can be reached at [email protected]

10
Disabled
Laura Peterson (not verified)
Jun 20 2012 - 6:46am
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90674
/news-and-blog/blog/2012/06/15/did-you-know-wpts-jeff-lifson-played-rugby-owned-part-of-g1-winner-dream-rush
10 am on June 15, 2012

Jeff Lifson (or “Liffy,” as he’s lovingly known) is West Point Thoroughbreds’ Executive Vice President of Sales and Operations. He joined WPT as a staff member in 2004 and currently resides in Louisville, Ky. with his wife, Louisville native Stephanie Collins, and their two children –  Amanda and Josh.

Jeff is an Iowa native who graduated from Williams College with a BA in History (1986) and of Northwestern University with a Masters in Journalism (1989). He also made money in high school and college de-tasseling corn, was a ballet dancer for a good portion of his youth (from about 8-16 years old), played rugby in the scrum at Williams and escaped with his face and bone structure pretty much intact, and sang at Williams in a traveling singing group called the Springstreeters – the closest he ever got to living the life of a performer.

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618

Sean Clancy of ST Publishing wrote this wonderful blog about the highs and lows of horse racing. Sean is a longtime friend of WPT and as you can see below an absolute fanatic about the game. We think you’ll enjoy....


Hate our game? I love our game. I love it for the madness. For the unknown. For the highs and lows. I love it because out of all us experts, from all the analysis, from all the concocting and conjecture, nobody could come up with this scenario. I’ll Have Another scratched Friday afternoon, the day before his attempt at ending the Triple Crown drought. Some game.

I didn’t like the way he galloped Wednesday and Thursday; just not the same style or flourish as he exuded before the Derby and Preakness. Looked like a tired horse on tired wheels. Sound, sure. Spent, probably. I didn’t think he would scratch, didn’t predict he had a tendon, didn’t fathom it would all be over this soon, this fast. Tendonitis. Non-definition. Bowed tendon, in any parlance. He’s finished, retired, suddenly a footnote. Like it or hate it, in this game, it’s on to the next one. Next race, next star. I’m glad it was discovered Friday and not at 6:41 on Saturday.

As trainer Doug O’Neill said, “It’s a bummer.” Yeah, that’s it, a bummer. The big horse has left the building. Off to another career, another chapter. He went from being the horse who would save horse racing (blah, blah, blah) to another 2-for-3 stallion prospect, wedged somewhere between Point Given and Real Quiet.

It was a good ride. Five weeks, short a day.

Horse racing is the ultimate Indian giver. It gives, then it takes. It gives, then it takes. It gave us I’ll Have Another, his across-the-tracks jockey, his likable but divisive trainer  and the rest of an eclectic team who enjoyed the ride. Then it took them away. Boom, without warning, without salve, without apology. Over and done.

Click here to continue reading.

8
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Ascot_Royale (not verified)
Jun 22 2012 - 9:00am
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/news-and-blog/blog/2012/06/13/love-the-game-a-blog-about-the-highs-and-lows-of-racing-by-sean-clancy
8 am on June 13, 2012

Sean Clancy of ST Publishing wrote this wonderful blog about the highs and lows of horse racing. Sean is a longtime friend of WPT and as you can see below an absolute fanatic about the game. We think you’ll enjoy....

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618

Let’s talk about why we geld a horse. Typically, we’re looking to improve their results on the racetrack by helping them focus on athletic performance or by fixing medical issues that may be bothering them. We know we’re giving up stallion services at some future point, but the stallion market is extremely selective these days and you’re going to need a perfect pedigree or some really outstanding performances to make a profit by sending a horse to stud.

 

Our experience really tells us you can help a horse improve in a big way through gelding. Case in point is Awesome Gem – we castrated him as a 2-year-old, and now he’s a Grade I winner and is still running soundly today as a 9-year-old. If you have any questions about our West Point geldings, shoot me an email and I’ll be happy to answer them.

4
Disabled
DLenert
Jun 27 2012 - 11:56am
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90259
/news-and-blog/blog/2012/05/21/video-blog-why-geld-a-racehorse
12 pm on May 21, 2012

Let’s talk about why we geld a horse. Typically, we’re looking to improve their results on the racetrack by helping them focus on athletic performance or by fixing medical issues that may be bothering them. We know we’re giving up stallion services at some future point, but the stallion market is extremely selective these days and you’re going to need a perfect pedigree or some really outstanding performances to make a profit by sending a horse to stud.

tfinley
tfinley's picture
43

I attended the Ocala sales (OBS) twice this year. If you’ve never attended a horse sale, especially a 2-year-old in training sale, you've missed one of the great spectacles in sports. It’s the horse lover’s version of the NFL draft that is ongoing as I write this. Teams and highly-dedicated individuals are all looking for the future stars, often with success, more often not. Just the atmosphere alone makes it worth attending, but the possibilities and probabilities are especially what I enjoy. Try visiting the Keeneland sales or Ocala when you can. Great comradery, very relaxed and unpretentious considering the money being infused.


This OBS April sale had over 1,100 horse in the catalogue. As is typical, from the printing of the catalogue up to the sale, at least 10%  - sometimes many more - of the horses drop out. Injury, poor performance in the breeze show, and numerous other elements cause this level of withdrawals. Welcome to Thoroughbred horse racing! Welcome to the roller coaster ride of your life!

Consider this: If you are loo
king for the 2013 Kentucky Derby winner you will be wrong every time except once, barring the first-ever "dead heat." No guarantee that winner will even come from the sales, any sales. Nor is it a lock it will be a colt, or a horse bred in the USA, or one with a spectacular pedigree. With this as background I started thinking of the concepts of value, luck (good and bad) and simply hard work. Having been around West Point Thoroughbreds for almost 19 years now I've seen all those elements time and time again. As they relate to the horse sales please consider this;

Value: I watched a horse sell for $220,000 and then the very next horse sell for $10,000. Doesn't a Hyundai sometimes outlast a Ferrari? I think a Hyundai Sonata is one of the best values in the automobile world. Maybe, just maybe, this $10,000 horse will beat the $220,000 purchase in a race six months from now.

When 2- and 3-year-olds run, the past performances will show the purchase price of the horse, if bought at auction. Every novice bettor says to me, watching a maiden race with multiple first-time starters, "Well, they paid much more for this horse than any other one in the field, so I'm going to place a bet on him." I remind them that Seattle Slew cost $17,500 at auction. He didn't know that statistic, I presume, when he won the Triple Crown.

It might seem obvious, but a strong component of the WPT decision-making process is to anticipate and calculate what a horse looks to be worth, in other words what he should sell for. Case in point, there was a horse we loved but from a relatively obscure stallion that we hoped we could obtain for around $50,000. At the hammer drop he sold for $135,000. At that point we were long gone. If that horse wins a Grade One race we made a bad decision. However, the process of understanding value is critical in running any business. The next day we "stole" a Sharp Humor colt for what we believe was a great price point, so it goes both ways.


Luck: If investors don't believe the element of "luck" is in play, they should watch the movie about Secretariat and th
e famous coin toss that resulted in the coin toss winner making one of the most unlucky choices in Thoroughbred history. The winner chose the other horse and Secretariat went on to not only win, but dominate the Triple Crown races.

How about yours truly heading out to Belmont Park, on a beautiful mid-week spring day in May 1974 to try and win a few bucks with my slowly improving handicapping skills. I have no idea if I won or lost that day, but, something happened that I will remember forever. In a two-year-old maiden special weight race for fillies a horse named Suzest was being touted around the grandstand. When the gates opened up an almost black first time starter came flying out of the ten post and never looked back. Suzest was fifteen lengths behind her in second place. The filly who tied the track record was of course Ruffian. On a Wednesday afternoon, with nothing to do, I witnessed greatness. Lucky, for sure! Luck appears in so many forms and places in horse racing.

Simply put, Hard work: When a much younger Terry Finley purchased Big City Bound on his own, his selling point was (slight paraphrase): "She has a great rear end." I jumped in thinking, I guess that's a good thing. She became the first WPT stakes winner and was one of the fastest fillies in the country up to four and a half furlongs. The question always was, will she hang on for five or six furlongs? She often did!

Fast forward about 16 years and consider the expertise within the organization which now easily exceeds 100 years, as opposed to the three or four years when Big City Bound was the star of the stable. What has changed? Obviously experience level, size of the business, and an eclectic group of people working hard every day on every aspect of the game. Now, heart scans and stride analysis open up avenues that other buyers, with less means or willingness to make the effort, don't support. In this most recent sale Terry Finley personally took charge and worked tirelessly with Erin Finley to narrow the enormous number of offerings down to a very low number of serious candidates, maybe 20, then 12, then to the final "value" purchases of three beautiful horses. Hundreds of hours, physical inspections, conversations, and data analysis resulting in three more occupants of WPT stables. I like to think of this as my investment dollars at work. To say our trainers are excited with the 13 total sales purchases made this season would be the understatement of the year. They are thrilled across the board.

I am the longest-tenured WPT partner and very proud to be able to say that! Best racing luck to those reading this. Remember WPT offers considerable value and will always be committed to hard work. See you at the races!

Respectfully,
Clif Hickok   

10
Disabled
EFinley
May 26 2012 - 9:21pm
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90163
/news-and-blog/blog/2012/05/16/clif-hickok-the-elements-of-value-luck-and-hard-work-in-racing
8 am on May 16, 2012

I attended the Ocala sales (OBS) twice this year. If you’ve never attended a horse sale, especially a 2-year-old in training sale, you've missed one of the great spectacles in sports. It’s the horse lover’s version of the NFL draft that is ongoing as I write this. Teams and highly-dedicated individuals are all looking for the future stars, often with success, more often not. Just the atmosphere alone makes it worth attending, but the possibilities and probabilities are especially what I enjoy. Try visiting the Keeneland sales or Ocala when you can. Great comradery, very relaxed and unpretentious considering the money being infused.

Anonymous's picture

Follow the WPT buying team throughout the two-year-old sales. The team's spent time in California and Florida since early March looking to acquire juveniles to campaign under the black and gold silks. Terry Finley leads the buying team and loves the class we've assembled thus far. Did you know WPT has purchased more grade one winners from the 2-year-old in training sales than any other owner in the country?

 

Each sale begins with an “under tack show” where each horse catalogued “breezes” or shows their speed mostly at an eighth of a mile, but sometimes at a quarter mile. Trainers, owners, agents, and consignors are on hands for the breezes. WPT then utilizes professional stride analysis to evaluate the action, efficiency, and stride lengths of each horse. That’s how we start narrowing things down. From there we look at horses back at the barns, consider pedigrees, then evaluate both vet results and heart scans before heading to the ring to acquire the the horses that jump through all the hoops and could potentially carry the black and gold silks.

 

If you're interested in learning more about West Point Thoroughbreds and these horses, please contact Casey Irving at (518)-583-6406.

 

OBS April Sale

 

4/26-Terry

Didn’t buy anything on day three at OBS. At an open sale like this, there are a lot of horses to weed through to find ones you like.

Today we purchased a lovely dark bay son of Sharp Humor. He’s a great fit for Wayne Catalano’s Arlington-based program. His pre-sale work was deceptively good last week. He’s a diamond in the rough and we saw a ton of value with him. With squeaky clean x-rays and a good mind, he could be an early 2-year-old winner just like his daddy!

Pictures and more video to come!

I’m down in Camden, SC this weekend to watch the babies train at Kip Elser’s place. Saw them two weeks ago and they all looked great! It’s so fascinating watching these 2-year-olds develop into racehorses.

 

Click here to watch his breeze.

 

4/24- Terry

Got a super NY-bred son of Utopia (JPN) (pictured top right) today at the OBS Sale. We love NY-Breds and have had quite a bit of success with them. Utopia’s first foals are 3-year-olds and he’s gotten off to a good start. He’s amongst the leading sires in New York right now. This colt is an excellent physical. He’s got good bone, a smart eye, and incredible balance.

Had a nice dinner in Tampa with a client. Back to the sales grounds tomorrow morning to do second looks on the day three horses and to make the shortlist for the day four horses. Expect us to get one or two more.

With an open sale like this, it takes quite a bit of work to weed through the not so good horses. If you do your homework, you can really find diamonds in the rough that jump though all the hoops. This colt vetted and heart scanned well above his peers. For anybody interested in racing in New York, this is the horse for you.

 

4/23 Terry- Bought an awesome Circular Quay colt (pictured at right) this afternoon at the OBS April Sale. I love this horse and have been watching him since I arrived in Ocala last week. We purchased him from Casse Sales, the same people who sold us grade one winner Lear’s Princess. A family of horsemen. This colt has a solid frame on him, but isn’t too big. I like to see horses with meat on their bones that aren’t too big and hard on themselves.

If he was by a more established stallion, he probably brings triple the money. Circular Quay was a hard knocking racehorse and I have no problem whatsoe
ver supporting a promising young stallion like him. This colt had one of the best works of the sale. He went an eighth of a mile in 10.1 and has a stride length 1.58 feet above average. Wow.


We’ve been hard at work the past few days. With over 1,000 horses catalogued, it takes time to find the diamonds in the rough. Have a few horses on the list tomorrow that have a strong chance to be future black and gold bearers. Maybe even a NY-bred or two :).

Click here to watch him breeze.

 

Keeneland Sale

 

WPT purchased two really exciting prospects at Keeneland. Both horses passed our stride analysis and heart scan process with flying colors. They both look like the type that should be making noise at Saratoga this summer! Click here to watch their breezes.

Hip #23 Lemon Drop Kid filly named Trophy Point. Her pedigree scream versatility and two turns.


Hip #156 Value Plus colt named Legalize. He’s a Louisiana-bred who’s as athletic as they come. Who wants to come to New Orleans?  

 

 

 

Fasig Tipton- The Florida Sale

 

Click here to visit Fasig Tipton's website.

 

 

 

OBS Sale Summary: March 13th & 14th
WPT purchased five horses at the OBS 2-Year-Old Sale. It was a great couple days for the buying team, led by Terry Finley. We hope you enjoy the photos and videos of the horses.


Click here to watch the breeze videos.

Hip #4- Lawyer Ron colt out of Grade 1 Winner Jostle
Hip #81- Congrats filly out of Ponderway.
Hip #176- Stormy Atlantic filly out of stakes winner Touchnow.
Hip #321- Sky Mesa colt out of Flying Afleet
Hip #355- Tale of the Cat filly out of I’m Beguiled Again

See below for more details and photos.
The entire buying team is thrilled with the purchases and there's already been a great deal of interest in these juveniles.

 

Lawyer Ron colt- Hip 4

 

Congrats filly- Hip 81

 

Stormy Atlantic filly- Hip 176

 

Hip 321- Sky Mesa colt

 

Hip 355- Tale of the Cat filly

 

 

 

Barretts Sale Summary: March 5th

 

WPT purchased three rock solid juveniles at the Barretts Sale in California. All three will be trained by Craig Dollase.

 

Click here to watch the breeze videos.

 

Hip #8- Pure Prize filly out of Gatherindy

Hip #91- Eddington colt out of Gottah Penny

Hip #Lion Heart colt out of Profesora

 

Pure Prize filly:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eddington colt:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lion Heart colt:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10
Disabled
Henrietta C. Patten (not verified)
Apr 17 2012 - 5:42pm
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88845
/news-and-blog/blog/2012/04/26/sales-blog-sharp-humor-colt-purchased-for-wayne-catalanos-arlington-based-program
10 pm on April 26, 2012

Follow the WPT buying team throughout the two-year-old sales. The team's spent time in California and Florida since early March looking to acquire juveniles to campaign under the black and gold silks. Terry Finley leads the buying team and loves the class we've assembled thus far. Did you know WPT has purchased more grade one winners from the 2-year-old in training sales than any other owner in the country?

 

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618

Watch the video below and learn how my team and I select horses at world class select sales for syndication to our Partners. We use technology to help identify the best possible prospects to run under the black and gold silks. Hear from Partners about their experiences, and watch a memorable race.


Have some thoughts or questions? Shoot me an e-mail at [email protected]. Share this video with your friends, family, and colleagues interested in racing.

 

 

If you liked that video and are interested in Thoroughbred ownership, check out our article that explains 5 things you need to know.

   

               New Call-to-action

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DLenert
Jun 13 2012 - 8:03am
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7 am on April 17, 2012

Watch the video below and learn how my team and I select horses at world class select sales for syndication to our Partners. We use technology to help identify the best possible prospects to run under the black and gold silks. Hear from Partners about their experiences, and watch a memorable race.

tfinley
tfinley's picture
43

Today I’m talking about the West Point Partner. Our Partners come to us with all different styles, personalities, and backgrounds, but some consistent traits stay the same between us. Trust is key; our Partners know we’re always going to do what’s best for their horse. That’s a pledge that will never be broken from us – put the horse first. Another is that we’re looking out for your financial interests. Our Partners have different levels of experience and different goals and objectives, and Partner education is something we’re committed to.

In the coming months we’ll touch upon more of the aspects of our business that haven’t been very well exposed – what goes into training a racehorse, managing a racehorse, what’s the experience of dealing with a vet or blacksmith? What about reading the “Sheets?” If you have a particular question you’d like to see answered in this video series, feel free to email me and I’ll take a look.

 

6
Disabled
tfinley
Apr 11 2012 - 8:30am
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89556
/news-and-blog/blog/2012/04/09/terrys-video-blog-west-point-partners-and-future-education
10 am on April 09, 2012

Today I’m talking about the West Point Partner. Our Partners come to us with all different styles, personalities, and backgrounds, but some consistent traits stay the same between us. Trust is key; our Partners know we’re always going to do what’s best for their horse. That’s a pledge that will never be broken from us – put the horse first. Another is that we’re looking out for your financial interests. Our Partners have different levels of experience and different goals and objectives, and Partner education is something we’re committed to.

tfinley
tfinley's picture
43

The Kentucky Derby prep trail always generates interest among those thinking about joining the ranks of ownership.


Sometimes it’s hard to find the best way to convey to people how truly thrilling and exciting owning a racehorse can be. If you’re looking into joining a partnership, you’re pretty much guaranteed to see the same words on any company’s marketing materials - “Experience the thrills and excitement of your horse...” running down the stretch, standing in the winner’s circle, walking through the paddock, etc.


We all use those words. Experiencing thrills and excitement is not a competitive differentiator. No matter who you own a horse with or what kind of horse you own, you will experience thrills and excitement. It’s inherent to the sport.

So how do we best illustrate how thrilling it can be?

We got lucky one afternoon when one of our clients called his rep during the live running of a race and fortunately for us, went to voicemail. The result is this commercial, “Sherm’s Call,” which we believe better conveys the “thrills and excitement of ownership,” more than words on paper or text on monitor.

Every time we run that spot, we get notes in saying how much people enjoy it, so it stays in our marketing toolbox. I know how Sherm felt that day. My New-York bred racehorse Rereadthefootnotes won the 2010 Hollie Hughes stakes and the result was a new nickname for me, “Shermette”. But that is a blog for another day, and earplugs.

Interested in learning more about what we do as racing managers?  You can check out Terry Finley’s new video blog series.

3
Read/Write
DLenert
Nov 28 2016 - 10:19am
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89433
/news-and-blog/blog/2012/03/30/conveying-the-thrills-and-excitement-of-thoroughbred-racehorse-ownership
9 am on March 30, 2012

The Kentucky Derby prep trail always generates interest among those thinking about joining the ranks of ownership.


Sometimes it’s hard to find the best way to convey to people how truly thrilling and exciting owning a racehorse can be. If you’re looking into joining a partnership, you’re pretty much guaranteed to see the same words on any company’s marketing materials - “Experience the thrills and excitement of your horse...” running down the stretch, standing in the winner’s circle, walking through the paddock, etc.

DLenert
DLenert's picture
415

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