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Partner Phillip Underwood and his family joined the West Point Thoroughbreds “family” last year. We sat down with Phil last week to talk about his ownership experience with West Point Thoroughbreds and how the sport of Thoroughbred racing has brought him closer to his two daughters, Katie and Emily.


Name: Phillip Underwood


Hometown: Seattle, Washington


Currently residence: Marietta, Georgia


Family: Wife Kimberly and daughters Katie (11) and Emily (5)

Katie is an avid equestrian, and Emily is just getting into the sport. Phil tells us a pony has been on the girls’ Christmas list for three years now.


Career: Director - MRO Services Operations and Delta Airlines. Underwood works in Delta’s technical operations division, which provides maintenance services to over 150 airlines worldwide. Prior to joining the Delta team, he spent three years with Ernst & Young, LLP and served six years in the United States Marine Corps. Phil is a CPA and has an MBA from the University of Georgia.


Q & A


How were you introduced to racing?

  • My great grandfather raised draft horses in Washington and often visited Longacres, which is now Emerald Downs.


What made you invest with WPT?

  • I found the West Point website to be very transparent and informative. I contacted them and my first interaction with Tom Bellhouse was memorable. Being I was in the Marine Corps, I was also drawn to Terry’s military background.


How has your experience been thus far?

  • This experience is all about family. Being involved in a partnership has allowed me to connect with my girls on a whole new level. My daughters have grown up around horses, but they were so excited to spend time on the backside with Thoroughbreds. When we were in Saratoga this past summer, Terry and Tom Bellhouse coordinated with Rosie Napravnik’s agent so my girls could meet their favorite jockey. That was the icing on the cake for me. After meeting Rosie, my daughter Katie told me she had the best weekend of her life.


What’s your favorite racetrack?

  • I’ll always be partial to Emerald Downs, but I’d have to chose Saratoga. I love the ability to get up the morning and be close with the horses. I also love the camaraderie with the West Point team and my fellow Partners. We visited Saratoga for the first time last year, and have already carved off three weekends to visit in 2014. I like having diversity in my stable, so we purchased a West Coast-based horse and plan to head out to Santa Anita and Del Mar.


What are you most looking forward to in 2014?

  • I’m really looking forward watching our young horses develop. I’d also love to win a stakes race this year. Katie and I sat down one afternoon and studied the photos and pedigrees of the new offerings. She loves greys and picked the Birdstone filly Ring Knocker. Needless to say, we’re very excited to see her run this year as a 2-year-old.


Favorite horse of all time?

  • Slew O’Gold


Underwood’s daughters Katie and Emily helping their dad select a new 2-year-old to add to their stable:

 

underwood.jpg

 

Emily and Katie made signs in support of Commanding Curve in the 140th Kentucky Derby. Many of our Partners become emotionally invested in all horses in the stable, not just the ones in which they have a financial interest.

 

underwood1.jpeg

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JBarry
Jun 5 2015 - 8:28pm
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3 pm on May 14, 2014

Partner Phillip Underwood and his family joined the West Point Thoroughbreds “family” last year. We sat down with Phil last week to talk about his ownership experience with West Point Thoroughbreds and how the sport of Thoroughbred racing has brought him closer to his two daughters, Katie and Emily.

EFinley
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Racing Partnerships Bring Families Together

We’re still trying to catch our breath following Commanding Curve’s runner-up finish in the 140th running of the Kentucky Derby.

Commanding Curve Partners from around the country converged in Louisville with their family and friends with a common goal, seeing their horse compete in the Kentucky Derby.

It was an unforgettable experience shared by all, and we want to share our story with you in this video.

 

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Tina (not verified)
Apr 21 2017 - 2:20am
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12 pm on May 08, 2014

We’re still trying to catch our breath following Commanding Curve’s runner-up finish in the 140th running of the Kentucky Derby.

DLenert
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Blog

Ragozin Sheets are a valuable tool when it comes to racehorse management. Are they the only thing that goes into race selection? Of course not.

 

There is no substitute for good horsemanship and managers cannot suffer from “paralysis by analysis” with the numbers, but these accurate performance ratings play a huge role in the “science” of managing racehorses.

 

These statistical charts were created over 50 years ago to better handicap races, and are now used frequently by major owners and trainers.

 

The rating includes speed, weight, allowance for unusual track condition, racing wide or saving ground, headwinds or tailwinds, peculiarities of track construction such as downhill areas, etc.

 

The numbers generally range from zero to the forties. The lower the figure the better the race. The numbers measure how far away from a championship rating (zero) this

horse was on this day.

 

A one point difference in a Ragozin number generally equates to a one to two length gap between finishers. In some instances, the winner can earn a higher number than the horses behind him due to circumstances such as missing the break, being caught very wide, etc.

 

Over time, the Ragozin numbers have shown that horses who run extremely well in Triple Crown races during the Triple Crown almost never get back to their peak ability.


 

Click here to view graded stakes winner Twilight Eclipse’s Ragozin Sheet

 

Click here to see a list of symbols used with the figures

 

A horse’s most recent race is the highest up in the furthest right column. Twilight Eclipse ran a 7- in the Sword Dancer.

 

The left column shows his 3-year-old races. He ran a 14- in his first career start.

 

Figures at the bottom represent races at the beginning of the year. Figures at the top represent races at the end of the year.

 

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EFinley
Sep 4 2013 - 1:44pm
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/news-and-blog/blog/2013/12/16/how-are-ragozin-sheets-used-to-manage-racehorses
10 am on December 16, 2013

Ragozin Sheets are a valuable tool when it comes to racehorse management. Are they the only thing that goes into race selection? Of course not.

 

There is no substitute for good horsemanship and managers cannot suffer from “paralysis by analysis” with the numbers, but these accurate performance ratings play a huge role in the “science” of managing racehorses.

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618
Blog
How are Ragozin Sheets Used To Manage Racehorses?

I want to share my ideas as a young person in the sport. If you’re reading this, chances are you love Thoroughbreds and racing. I want my grandchildren to experience horse racing like I’ve been so blessed to experience. It sounds simple, but we all really need to do our part to bring in new fans, owners, and young blood into the game.

 

How can we do that? Here are some ideas in no particular order...

 

1. If you have access to box seats at any track, not a race day should go by where the seats are empty. Give them to a coworker, family member, or somebody who did something nice for you.

 

2. Go to the track and buy a few $5 betting vouchers. When your hairdresser says, “Oh my God I’ve always wanted to go to the track!,” whip one out and give it to him/her. Next time you get your hair cut, ask them how much fun they had.

 

3. Probably the simplest of all, whenever you go to the track, ask yourself “who can I bring with me?” Don’t you agree with most people all it takes is one visit and they’re hooked? I’m biased but if I were new in the game, I’d want to go to Saratoga and/or Keeneland. (Ok Del Mar you’re a close third).

 

4. Bring someone to a horse sale --they’re FREE and open to the public. There’s Keeneland and Fasig-Tipton in Kentucky and OBS in Florida amongst others. Get them a catalogue and go take them to look at weanlings -- who doesn’t love them? Contact me if you need help finding the closest sale to you.

 

The Saratoga yearling sales over the summer are HUGE social events.

 

5. Throw a party on a big race day whether its Breeders’ Cup, Kentucky Derby, or the Dubai World Cup. Put a pool together so people get into it and get competitive.

 

6. All the teachers out there will roll their eyes on this one -- teach your kid a few math lessons using the racing form! I learned fractions that way (three quarters of a mile or six furlongs is shorter than ⅞ of a mile or seven furlongs) and I turned out okay.

 

7. Encourage people to attend new owners seminars, handicapping seminars, and other events where they can meet people with the same passion. The Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association (TOBA) is a great resource as is America’s Best Racing.

 

8. Know somebody who would love to own a racehorse but doesn’t know what the first step is? Encourage them to join a partnership. I might be biased, but I hear West Point Thoroughbreds is a great organization. :)

 

9. Encourage the racing fan in your life to get engaged -- the internet is a beautiful thing. There are numerous industry leaders on Facebook, Twitter, etc. There’s never been a better a time for people to find something they’re passionate about and become immersed in it.

 

10. Talk to people about how racing is a family affair. You can be any age, from any place, and have little or no athletic ability to participate. Click here to read Debbie Finley’s blog about families in racing.

 

Random fact: Did you know equestrian is the only Olympic sport where men and women compete as equals?

 

11. I graduated from the University of Kentucky -- they have a great Horse Racing Club. Grab your roommate and find out when the meetings are.

 

12. Open a betting account and tell a friend to do the same-- there are a number of sites out there. TwinSpires, TVG, XpressBet. Don’t blow your life savings, but have some fun.

 

13. Beg your spouse to let you add BOTH HRTV AND TVG to the television package. :)

 

Any other ideas? Leave your comments below and I’ll add to the list.

 

Now get to work.


P.S. WPT Partners, email me ([email protected]) your story and let me know how you got into the game in 500 words or less. We’ll put them together and share them on the website for others to enjoy.

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DLenert
Dec 18 2013 - 9:27am
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11 am on December 09, 2013

I want to share my ideas as a young person in the sport. If you’re reading this, chances are you love Thoroughbreds and racing. I want my grandchildren to experience horse racing like I’ve been so blessed to experience. It sounds simple, but we all really need to do our part to bring in new fans, owners, and young blood into the game.

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618
Blog
13 Easy Ways to Grow Thoroughbred Racing

Want to take a ride on a Breeders’ Cup horse? You’ll get a real sense of what it’s like if you watch this video of Rock Me Baby’s final prep for the $1,000,000 Breeder’s Cup Turf Sprint (G1).

Listen in behind the scenes in the barn as trainer Craig Dollase gives workout instructions to jockey Joe Talamo. Check out the horse’s ears as he picks up speed leading into the work, keenly attuned to the subtle cues Joe provides, telling him it’s time to roll! The meat of the video begins at the 0:33 mark.

West Point Thoroughbreds Rock Me Baby completed his final race preparations at Hollywood Park on October 30th. He worked three furlongs in 36:60 earning the rare west coast notation of breezing, which means he did it effortlessly. Rocky is ready to contest the Breeders’ Cup. Watch his race Saturday, November 2nd on NBC Sports Network coverage at 2:05 p.m. PT.

If the Breeders’ Cup has you thinking about racehorse ownership, click the button below, provide your name and email address, and we’ll give you a free article on the 5 things you need to know before you buy a racehorse. Whether you are interested in competing at the highest levels or claiming a horse at you local track, the information is invaluable to anyone interested in getting into this great game.

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DLenert
Nov 4 2013 - 1:34pm
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1 pm on October 30, 2013

Want to take a ride on a Breeders’ Cup horse?

DLenert
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Rock Me Baby and Jockey Joe Talamo with Jockey Cam for Final Breeders' Cup Workout

West Point has three horses running in the Breeders’ Cup this year: Suns Out Guns Out (Marathon), Twilight Eclipse (Turf), and Rock Me Baby (Turf Sprint).

 

Three new sets of silks are ordered, and we’re getting black blinkers for Suns Out Guns Out. If you watched his last race you’ll see he sported bright red ones -- can’t clash with the black and gold on national tv!

 

We started the process of securing Breeders’ Cup seats for our Partners months ago. As of yesterday, WPT Partners spent over $90,000 on tickets plus $6,000 on participant hats. If you estimate a conservative cost per person of $1,550 just for air, lodging, food, and entertainment, our Partners and staff alone will proudly contribute about $300,000 to the Breeders’ Cup and local economy.

 

Earlier this week we had conference calls with each of the partnerships competing in the Breeders’ Cup to go over how their horse is training up to the race and all the wonderful upcoming events. I received several calls afterwards from Partners so pumped that they were literally jumping out of their skin from the build up! That’s what I love about this moment in time: excitement, wonder, and possibility of it all.

 

Once again we’ll join industry leaders supporting Thoroughbred aftercare by pledging 0.5% of Breeders’ Cup winnings to New Vocations. Giving back to those who give us all so much joy is important, and we sure would love to write a big ol’ check come mid-November.

 

Terry Finley, Tom Bellhouse, and Erin Finley land in California on Tuesday. Jeff Lifson and Lindsey Heumann arrive on Wednesday. Our West Coast customer service guru Nancy Dollase will also be the grounds -- she knows the lay of the land out there as much as anybody.

 

Win, lose, or draw, it’s shaping up to be a very special weekend for our Partners and team.

 

P.S. We’ll take lots of pictures Breeders’ Cup week. Be sure to follow us on Twitter to get the latest trackside news from the team.

 

 

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Anonymous
Nov 1 2013 - 9:45pm
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3 pm on October 28, 2013

West Point has three horses running in the Breeders’ Cup this year: Suns Out Guns Out (Marathon), Twilight Eclipse (Turf), and Rock Me Baby (Turf Sprint).

 

Three new sets of silks are ordered, and we’re getting black blinkers for Suns Out Guns Out. If you watched his last race you’ll see he sported bright red ones -- can’t clash with the black and gold on national tv!

Anonymous's picture
Blog
Breeders' Cup 2013: Behind the Scenes at WPT
When we speak with prospective owners, it’s pretty clear they come to us loving Thoroughbred racing and appreciating the horse itself. There is a deep respect for the sheer beauty and an awe of the racehorse as an athlete. In discussing ownership, our conversations inevitably turn to “What happens to horses when they can no longer race?”
 
This is a great question and one that the whole industry has to ask. If some 24,000 Thoroughbreds are born each year, where do they all go? Owners new to the game have a misconception that all horses can go into the breeding pool. Only the top 1% of colts go on to become stallions, and just because a filly has two ovaries doesn’t make her a good breeding prospect, or give her residual value. If you are truly in the game because you love it, you’ll understand that for the future of our industry, we should only breed the best to the best; we dilute the quality of future prospects if we breed sub-par runners. Take a look at the research out there - good horses produce good horses. The statistical data stacks up.

More often than not, your horse is going to be retired from racing at some point - not to be sold for top dollar. I’m not saying it’s impossible to get a return (we’ve had several financially successful syndicates like Dream Rush, Lear’s Princess, Macho Again, and Flashy Bull to name a few), but those horses are the minority, not the majority.

West Point will retire a horse for two reasons: if they have an injury or if it doesn’t make sense to keep the horse in training any longer. The first one is self-explanatory; we will not run an injured animal. All of our runners are immediately evaluated by a vet at the slightest hint of something wrong. If it looks like the injury is non-life-threatening but something a horse can’t recover from to race again, he’ll be retired and rehabbed. We’ll also retire a horse if they wind up running in low-level claiming races uncompetitively. A horse like this isn’t close to paying its way and is in danger of falling into hands that won’t provide the level of care we would. We make every effort to follow horses that have been claimed away from us to ensure they are cared for following their racing careers.

We have a variety of ways of finding a new home for our retirees. Our first option is to give the existing ownership group the opportunity to take the horse. We love it when a Partner steps up to adopt a racehorse, it's very neat to watch their relationship with a horse develop.

We also have a database group we reach out to if a horse isn’t adopted right away. These are people who have indicated they’re interested in taking an off the track Thoroughbred. Usually they’re looking for a dressage horse or an eventer (after all, the Thoroughbred is a courageous athlete). Here’s what I know from the people who have adopted horses from us: they’re pleasantly surprised by how affectionate and well-mannered the horse is. Racehorses sometimes get a bad reputation as being high strung and difficult to handle, but it’s important to realize our horses were always intended to be well taken care of. From the moment they were born someone has been handling them, caring for them and teaching them.
 
If you’re interested in being added to our contact list, email me at [email protected]

The third option we use is a rescue/placement facility. If we go this direction we often will ask that a donation from the ownership group be given with the horse to help offset his costs while he’s at the facility. We take this route because such facilities have placement as their core competency.

Although these thoughts usually aren’t first on the radar in the exciting times of new racehorse ownership, what will happen to the horse at the end of its’ career is something to think about when you become an owner. I think we all have a responsibility to each and every runner we own, the fast ones and the slow ones.

And just because they’re done racing doesn’t mean your responsibility ends.
 
If you currently own one of our former racehorses, we'd love to see some photos. Shoot me a note at [email protected]
 
 

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DLenert
Sep 1 2012 - 6:32am
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12 pm on October 07, 2013
When we speak with prospective owners, it’s pretty clear they come to us loving Thoroughbred racing and appreciating the horse itself. There is a deep respect for the sheer beauty and an awe of the racehorse as an athlete. In discussing ownership, our conversations inevitably turn to “What happens to horses when they can no longer race?”
EFinley
EFinley's picture
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Former WPT runner Merus Miami

Why is there a markup on West Point Thoroughbreds’ horses? What's the value proposition? These are questions I’m sometimes asked by people who are thinking about getting into racehorse ownership.

There’s value in sitting back and enjoying the experience of watching your horse compete without worrying about extensive operational details - you benefit from expert institutional knowledge and know that top industry professionals take care of your horses.


Sure, you could buy a racehorse on your own and not pay additional fees. But, who would you talk to? How would you go about selecting horses at a sale? How would you transport your horse after purchase? Do you have access to the sport’s best trainers and jockeys? These are just a few of the myriad issues you’ll face as a new owner going out on your own.   

There are partnerships out there whose principals claim they don’t charge a management fee or a markup, but then they take 20% of the ownership as an “organization fee.”

To that I say, “huh?”.

Also, it’s not hard for an individual with minimal experience in this game to hang a shingle, go to the sales, and start a partnership. By investing with WPT you’re investing in years of experience from a team of knowledgeable people passionate about our clients and horses.

What are you paying for with a markup on West Point horses? Well, here it is in a nutshell...


-Access to the best people and venues in the business. We’ve built relationships with industry professionals that take years for someone to develop on their own. You could be dreaming of owning a racehorse one day, then become a Partner on a runner under the care of Derby-winning trainer H. Graham Motion the next. We give our Partners opportunities to be part of industry events and participate on racing’s biggest stages on the biggest days.


-Consistent Communication with Partners on every member of their stable. I guarantee you’ll have one-on-one contact with a member of my team on a regular basis, and our top-of-the-line website is the best of any partnership group in the industry. We provide workouts, race information, news, and a variety of new content every day. You can also watch replays of every WPT race and enjoy features on key subjects.

-Performance: on the racetrack. Since 2005 our runners have won at a 20% clip, hit the board 50% of the time, and earned over $20 million in purses. Our horses and Partners have competed in the Kentucky Derby, Preakness, Belmont, Breeders’ Cup, Travers, and Hong Kong Mile. Our runners have earned some of the most prestigious graded stakes trophies from coast to coast. We’ve won races in Canada and Dubai. Grade One winners include Awesome Gem, Dream Rush, Flashy Bull, Irish Smoke, Lear's Princess, and Macho Again.

-Customer Service is a priority. We do everything we can to make sure our Partners enjoy their experience. Whether it’s seating at the track, a private barn tour, or a chat with a Hall of Fame trainer, we’ll work to make it happen.


-Creation: of each partnership. This includes filing fees for each and every state our Partners reside in.


-Management: of each partnership. My team (including our trainers) discuss each and every horse every week. Regular topics include overall progression, race selection, circuit changes, competition levels, race data (Beyers, Ragozin numbers, etc), gelding, surface chances, time off, equipment changes, etc.  To better align our interests with those of our Partners, we eliminated the monthly management fee for our partnerships, beginning in January 2012.  We do, however charge a monthly administrative fee for the ongoing cost of doing business.


-Assumption of risk: when syndicating a horse. You own 5% of a horse, and you’re not at all responsible for the remaining 95%, even if some of your Partners dont't pay training bills (that does happen once in awhile!!). WPT does not acquire capital upfront before buying horses- our clients have a choice as to which horses they invest in. If something happens to the horse before it is syndicated, WPT absorbs the loss.


-Acquisition costs: to acquire athletes. It’s expensive to perform the work and diligence required to evaluate and analyze prospective racehorses. X-ray diagnostics, veterinarian assessments, throat analyses, heart scans, stride analyses, and physical observations are just some of the costs associated with finding the best young racing prospects at public auction. Don’t forget actual sale price of the  horse when the hammer drops in the sales ring!

-Institutional knowledge: from years in the business. I’ve been doing this over 20 years - and made most of the mistakes that can be made by an owner.  No doubt I’ve learned fromthese mistakes. My team is comprised of people knowledgeable and passionate about racing as well.

-Education: for Partners. We actively blog on our website about industry topics and want our Partners to know the ins and outs of the game. Helping our clients learn more about this wonderful industry is important to us.

-Accounting/Administration duties are taken care of for you. For somebody who just wants to enjoy horse racing, accounting can be a hassle. Let us take care of paying the bills, providing quarterly statements, and arranging tax information. We pride ourselves in financial transparency. Our CFO Lindsey Huemann is a Certified Public Accountant.

You know the old adage, you get what you pay for.  I believe this especially holds true in racing partnerships. West Point is not for everyone wanting to enter into a racing partnership, but we can deliver a premium level of service and experience that can create a lifetime of memories, friendships, and camaraderie surrounding one of nature’s most inspiring creatures, the Thoroughbred.

So, that’s our take on “markups”.

I welcome your thoughts.

Terry Finley

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tfinley
Dec 13 2012 - 1:04pm
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/news-and-blog/blog/2013/09/30/no-markup-fees-you-get-what-you-pay-for-with-horse-racing-partnerships
1 pm on September 30, 2013

Why is there a markup on West Point Thoroughbreds’ horses? What's the value proposition? These are questions I’m sometimes asked by people who are thinking about getting into racehorse ownership.

There’s value in sitting back and enjoying the experience of watching your horse compete without worrying about extensive operational details - you benefit from expert institutional knowledge and know that top industry professionals take care of your horses.

tfinley
tfinley's picture
43
Blog
No Markup Fees- You Get What You Pay For With Horse Racing Partnerships

We sat down with WPT president Terry Finley for a few minutes earlier this week. Now a resident of Saratoga Springs, Finley is on the ground in Lexington, Kentucky for the Keeneland September Yearling Sale, which runs from the 9th-21st. With 3,908 yearlings catalogued, it requires hard work, dedication, and discipline when working to select the stable’s newest runners.

 

 

Q: How do you tackle a sale with so many yearlings?

 

TF: Quite a bit of preparation takes place before we even reach the sales ground. We study the catalogue and mark horses with pedigrees most fitting to our program and also evaluate previous sale data. Our experience shows we probably won’t be in the market for a horse who brought $500,000 as a weanling, so in most instances it’s better not to expend our resources on those horses.

 

Once we arrive at the sale, it’s a team effort. We split up the catalogue and assign each of our “short listers” a block of horses to evaluate. At the end of every day we meet and determine which horses make the “first cut”. I take a look at that group of horses and determine the ones we’ll continue pursuing.

 

Throughout the entire sale, we work off a dynamic document, making detailed notes on pedigree, conformation, vet work, heart analysis, biomechanical workups, etc. I find it’s very important to stay ahead of the game and organized at a sale with so many horses. At the beginning of each sale day, there are often only a few horses who “jumped through all the hoops” that we’ll try to buy.

 

Q: What is your take on the market for yearlings in 2013?

 

TF: The market is very strong. At the Fasig-Tipton July Sale, we saw a 10% increase in average price, 20% increase in median, and sharp decrease in buybacks from 2012. The Fasig-Tipton Saratoga sale was also solid -- there was a slight decrease in average price, but median price was up 11%. Buy backs were also down, a sign of consignor satisfaction with the market.

 

Because of this, we’ll place most of our focus on the middle days of the Keeneland Sale. It can be tough to buy horses in book one. We’re in the market for athletic individuals with quality pedigrees, but not in the market for horses by sires like Giant’s Causeway out of a grade one winning mares who are the best physicals in the sale. Those type of horses typically command over a million dollars.  

 

Q: What type of horse are you looking for at the yearling sales?

 

TF: The majority of our focus is on acquiring two-turn prospects to get our Partners to classic races. What does this mean? Well pedigree is a leading indicator of a stamina in a racehorse. Body type and cardio profile also play a major role in determining a horse’s propensity to go two turns.

 

Q: How important is the female family when selecting a yearling?

 

TF: It holds some weight, but it’s only one piece of the pie. Of course we’d love to say every horse we buy is out of a stakes winning mare who’s thrown nothing but stakes runners. That’s not reality. There’s no such thing as a perfect horse. If we love a horse physically and he vets, scopes, and heart scans, and he has a below average female family, that won’t take us off him completely, but it may cause us to be a bit more conservative with our valuation.

 

Awesome Gem earned nearly $3 million on the racetrack. His dam Piano, has thrown four winners from seven runners. Not one of those other runners ever competed in a stakes race, and most of them are claimers. It goes to show, pedigree isn’t everything.

 

Q: Buzz Chace was instrumental in helping you develop an eye for a good horse. Tell us a little bit about how he’s helped you.

 

TF: The racing industry lost a legend when Buzz passed recently. Not only was he exceptional at selecting horses, he was a great friend and an even better human being.

 

The most important piece of wisdom Buzz instilled in me was “a good horse can come from anywhere.”

 

We’re seeing that with our graded stakes winner Twilight Eclipse, who sold for $1,000 back in 2010 as a yearling. If I knew then what I know now, I would have been sitting in the front row of the sales ring on that cold January day.

 

Q: Finally, what’s your favorite restaurant in Lexington?

 

TF: Dudley’s...by far.

 

Click here to visit the Keeneland Sales website.

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tom flanagan (not verified)
Sep 12 2013 - 2:29pm
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/news-and-blog/blog/2013/09/09/a-few-minutes-with-terry-finley-keeneland-september-yearling-sale
2 pm on September 09, 2013

We sat down with WPT president Terry Finley for a few minutes earlier this week. Now a resident of Saratoga Springs, Finley is on the ground in Lexington, Kentucky for the Keeneland September Yearling Sale, which runs from the 9th-21st. With 3,908 yearlings catalogued, it requires hard work, dedication, and discipline when working to select the stable’s newest runners.

 

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618
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A Few Minutes With Terry Finley: Keeneland September Yearling Sale

Have you wondered what the process of entering horses into races entails? The Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association (TOBA) provides excellent educational resources for owners and published The “Chronology” of Entering a Race:
 



Entries are the official submissions by trainers which take place 48 or 72 hours, beginning at 7 a.m., before the day of the race to be run. (Note that Stakes and Handicap Races require a much longer lead-time). Because the tracks are generally closed at least one day a week, you must mentally "back up" the Entry date for a race being run on the day the meet resumes to the last racing day at the track.

Before any entry can be made, the specific horse must be registered with the Clerk of the Course (in the Racing Office), and its foal registration papers from The Jockey Club must be on file in the Racing Office.

Each entry must be accompanied by a form, filled out by your trainer, stating the name of the owner (or Partnership, Farm or Stable); the silks the horse will be running under; the name of the trainer, and which jockey is set to ride the mount -- as well as the horse's name, age, sex, color and parentage. The trainer must also specify if a horse runs with Lasix, if it has been gelded since its last race, and if it will be running with blinkers on or off.

Once all entries have been checked and processed, the Racing Secretary determines which races -- and their accompanying purses -- will be used to make up a day's program, or "card." He then determines "the set," meaning the order in which the races will be run on that day.

The "Final" is the announcement -- usually about 9:00 a.m. on a race-day -- of all the accumulated, confirmed entries for the day's written races. For any races that can accommodate more horses, entries will continue to be taken until about 10:30 a.m. The Draw is held.


Click here to visit TOBA’s website to continue reading and to learn what happens when a race overfills or does not attract enough entrants.
 



Want to see examples of things this article references?

Click here to see an example of an overnight.

Click here to see a condition book index- a listing of races at a particular track.

Click here to see a full condition book.


Have a question about the condition book or the process of entering horses into races? Leave a comment on this blog, and we’ll do our best to answer it for you.


 

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EFinley
Jan 3 2013 - 3:22pm
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Have you wondered what the process of entering horses into races entails? The Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association (TOBA) provides excellent educational resources for owners and published The “Chronology” of Entering a Race:
 

EFinley
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The Process of Entering Races for Racehorse Owners

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