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Do you ever wonder why racehorses wear blinkers? Do you know a horse's field of vision without blinkers? Over the Fourth of July, Marcus Hersh from drf.com wrote a comprehensive article on blinkers and their impact on racehorses. It's a very informative piece we thought you would enjoy.

West Point trainers use blinkers on our runners for a variety of reasons. Dallas Stewart added blinkers to Macho Again when he was a two-year-old because he kept trying to turn his head and look behind him. The equipment helped him focus and keep his mind on running forwards, which helped him become a grade one stakes winner.

Click here to read Hersh's article, "Blinkers: a closer look at their impact on racehorses." It has a photo gallery of the five common types of blinkers and a very cool graphic of a horse's field of vision. Several classic trainers are referenced. What did you think of the article?

Disabled
DLenert
Jul 5 2013 - 5:06pm
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/news-and-blog/blog/2013/07/05/racehorse-blinkers-explained-by-daily-racing-forms-marcus-hersh
5 pm on July 05, 2013

Do you ever wonder why racehorses wear blinkers? Do you know a horse's field of vision without blinkers? Over the Fourth of July, Marcus Hersh from drf.com wrote a comprehensive article on blinkers and their impact on racehorses. It's a very informative piece we thought you would enjoy.

DLenert
DLenert's picture
415

We knew we had a good one in True Blue Nation! She impressed from the first day webought her at the yearling sale. I saw her often at Crupi's New Castle Farm in Ocala Florida, as she started her 2-year-old development. Of all the 2-year-olds in the various barns this year she was the first to make it to the races!

Now Tom Albertrani has a reputation for both a low first time starter win percentage and slow(er) workouts (we support his training approach by the way).

So when True Blue Nation went postward on June 21 against five other first time starters, she was almost expectedly dismissed at 17.80 to 1 in the betting pool. The next highest priced horses were the Darley entry at 5.80 to 1. That made us the rank outsider. Not to mention the Todd Pletcher trainee at odds on in the race or the other horses trained by Mark Hennig, Rick Violette or Kiaran McLaughlin -- all top shelf trainers!!

So, True Blue Nation exploded out of the gate, was never really challenged and cruised home the winner by 5 1/4 lengths! Click here to watch the race. 

Next up the Schulyerville Stakes (G3) at Saratoga on July 19 (opening day). If she wins that race or any other Stakes race at a NYRA track this year she gets a $100,000 NYRA bonus to boot! WOW and WOW!

Fast forward to June 28 (remember the slow workout comment above), when two WPT charges worked side by side handling the four furlong distance in a rapid 48:54 seconds making Empire Dreams and Flat Jack the 4th fastest of 23 working at the distance. Did I mention they are also trained by Tom Albertrani? One would expect a half mile in 50 or even 51...well, not this morning! You can rest assured Tom didn't instruct the exercise riders to "go in 48 and change." These two horses had their own plan this morning and they had some fun kicking it up a notch!

Under my "someday peanuts, someday shells philosophy," we've had allot of peanuts recently! These horses are all putting smiles on the faces of their Partners. Where they go from here is up to the racing gods, but, we like all their respective chances.

The uncertainty of it all is one of the most endearing qualities of the Thoroughbred experience and those people who support them, care for them, and relish their accomplishments. As the Infinity car commercial states, “What are you driving?” To paraphrase - Have you considered a Thoroughbred today?

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EFinley
Jun 28 2013 - 8:37am
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8 am on June 28, 2013

We knew we had a good one in True Blue Nation! She impressed from the first day webought her at the yearling sale. I saw her often at Crupi's New Castle Farm in Ocala Florida, as she started her 2-year-old development. Of all the 2-year-olds in the various barns this year she was the first to make it to the races!

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618

What's the toughest decision you may face as a Thoroughbred racehorse owner? I would argue it is whether or not to place your horse in a claiming race. Most owners, including myself, try to look at their horses with a "glass half full" approach, believing that their talent level and performance are always on the improve, even despite occasional or frequent failures (or in Bellhouse the horse's case- 20 maiden tries before he found the winner’s circle).

As a rule, we should trust our trainer -- the objective person we pay handsomely to condition and evaluate our horse. Although it is not an exact science, good trainers know when to take advantage of poor performances -- by finding softer competition next time out -- with less chance of claim. That being said, losing your horse to an unexpected claim can be devastating to even the most seasoned owner. I've been around a few times when the red tag got clipped to the bridle and the tears started flowing. Never a good feeling for anyone, although in some cases a true financial blessing.

One of my favorite quotes came from an extremely polite, soft spoken assistant trainer who said to me, as I fretted after my horse was claimed,"You should throw a parade that someone gave you $35k for this horse."

Horse entry/placement has really become one of the hot buttons of ownership.

It never ceases to amaze me that "we" (because although I know better- I still do it) owners think we know exactly what level and time frame our horses should run at, despite not being around the horse everyday, like our training staff. "How did he eat up?" has become a favorite question of mine to ask Partners when they say we should run in a certain race on a certain day.

Anytime you're dealing with a living, breathing animal conditions change.

Unfortunately, Thoroughbreds are not race cars who roll off a hauler in the same condition they went on the previous week.
While we all would like to own a Kentucky Derby contender, the reality is over 80% of the races run in the United States are claimers.

One of our favorite moments of the summer of 2010 was when Montana Knight won a restricted claiming race to the roar of all his Partners and friends. To those in attendance near the big screen, they may have been confused as to whether it was Rachel Alexandra, or a regally bred son of Seattle Fitz.

As someone who has run in his fair share of them, there’s no disgrace in running in a claiming race.
 

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EFinley
Jun 24 2013 - 8:27am
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/news-and-blog/blog/2013/06/17/tom-bellhouse-theres-no-shame-in-running-in-claiming-races
10 am on June 17, 2013

What's the toughest decision you may face as a Thoroughbred racehorse owner? I would argue it is whether or not to place your horse in a claiming race.

TBellhouse
TBellhouse's picture
72

Tom Albertrani trains for West Point Thoroughbreds in New York and Florida. His well-rounded career includes a stint as a jockey, time spent as an assistant to Mark Casse and Hall of Fame trainer Bill Mott, and a period in Dubai as Godolphin Racing’s top assistant to Saeed Bin Suroor.

Top horses he was  involved with as an assistant included Theatrical and Cigar, Street Cry, Fantastic Light, and Daylami.


Albertrani returned to New York full time in 2003 and opened a public racing stable in 2005. In 2006, the regally bred-Bernardini brought him into the national spotlight, winning five consecutive stakes including the Preakness and Jockey Club Gold Cup. Albertrani has continued his success across the nation, and has trained graded stakes winners Freedom Child and Twilight Eclipse stakes winners King Congie and Belle of the Hall for the black and gold. Here, we get to know him a little better.


Q. What are your hobbies outside of racing?

A. I like to keep myself fit. I try to get over to the gym probably three times during the week. I squeeze that in and that’s about it. You don’t have a lot of time for hobbies in this business

Q. Favorite sports team?

A. I grew up as a Mets fan, so I still stay true to that

Q. Favorite Saratoga restaurant?
A. Villa Balsamo, it’s a great Italian spot

Q. Typical wake-up time?

A. Usually 5:00 a.m. or right around there

Q. Do you ever go on vacation?
A. If I did, I can’t remember the last one! (laughs)

On the racing side...

Q. How did you get involved with horses?
A. I was 13 living in Long Island and my uncle was a trainer. He got me exposed to sport, coming out on the weekends and during summer holidays during school to hotwalk horses and go to the races.

Q. How did you become a trainer?
A. First I was a jockey. I started when I was 18 and rode for a few years. Weight was catching up with me so I just started to get into galloping as an assistant trainer. I worked for Mark Casse in the early ‘80s and that led to eventually working for Bill Mott. After I was an assistant trainer for Saeed bin Suroor, I went out on my own in 2003.


Mott Back on Top as Leading TrainerQ. Who had the greatest impact on your  career?

A. In the beginning, it was guys like Angel Cordero Jr or Jorge Velasquez or even Steve Cauthen. Since i wanted to become a jockey I watched riders like that go through their careers with that polished way of riding. I looked up to them naturally because I was young and I wanted to be a good rider. Angel Cordero kind of inspired me as far as riding goes. Bill Mott definitely made an impact on my training style. I just think he’s a fantastic horseman. When I started working for him I had a lot of background by then, over the years of riding races and galloping horses, but when I went to Bill he was such an amazing horseman, I learned even more. He polished me up a little.

Q. Tell us a little about your methods. You’re not going to see many bullet works from Albertrani runners. Share your theories on training a racehorse.
A. I really just believe in keeping my horses healthy and sound. Sometimes my works might be a little slow, but in the long term, I think if you keep them healthy and sound if they’re good enough it’s going to come through. We spend a lot of time and do a lot of quicker gallops with them sometimes and don’t always give them those bullet works. We just bring them along easily and I think by doing it that way, we put them in the position to develop to the best of their natural ability.

Q. How do you know when a 2-year-old is ready to make their first start? What signs do they give?
A. Normally you go through the process of getting them fit and just kind of pay attention to see how tired they’re getting in their works. You watch them cool out and see how long it takes them to recover from works, you go by how fit they are, how quickly they learn around the starting gate, how quickly they break. Just when you think they’re ready get a race in them doesn’t always have to be their best race first time out. You get a little experience into them and want them to run well. Then you go from there.


Q. Give us a runthrough of a typical day on the racetrack for you.
A. I spend a lot of time on the phone. After the horses are done training, I usually make calls to owners, make entries, and
book jockeys. We average about 50 horses; we keep the majority at Belmont and a little overflow at Saratoga, and we have the string at Palm Meadows in the winter. There’s the vet and the blacksmith to see, and after I finish those things in the morning, I’m getting ready for the next day for training, getting the training book set up for the following day, perhaps going to the races to saddle a few and watch them run. If it’s a dark day, maybe I’ll get a little gym time in or something like that. But there’s always more paperwork that comes along to handle on those days, too.

Q. Tell us about Bernardini.

A. He was a pretty special horse to have around the barn. I could see right from the beginning he was a special horse before he ran. A lot of times you have horses you really like but they don’t turn out to be as good as you think they are, but he was special from the start and proved it over and over again.

 

Watch Bernardini win the 2006 Travers (G1):

 

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Disabled
DLenert
May 4 2012 - 10:33am
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89918
/news-and-blog/blog/2013/06/11/get-to-know-tom-albertrani
1 pm on June 11, 2013

Tom Albertrani trains for West Point Thoroughbreds in New York and Florida. His well-rounded career includes a stint as a jockey, time spent as an assistant to Mark Casse and Hall of Fame trainer Bill Mott, and a period in Dubai as Godolphin Racing’s top assistant to Saeed Bin Suroor.

Top horses he was  involved with as an assistant included Theatrical and Cigar, Street Cry, Fantastic Light, and Daylami.

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618
Partnerships allow thousands of people to get involved in owning a racehorse for a fraction of the cost of doing it on their own.  I’d love to tell you there’s not a single drawback to going this route, but it’s true that racing partnerships aren’t for everyone. The question is not “are partnerships the best way to own a racehorse?” The real question is: “is a partnership the best way for me to have the greatest ownership experience?” In this post I’m going to outline a few pros and cons of owning with West Point Thoroughbreds.  It is up to you to assess whether the positives outweigh the negatives.  Of course, I hope they do for you!
 
 
 
Pro: More Quality Horses for Your Budget - Portfolio diversification - it’s crucial with your investments and crucial in your racing stable. Partnerships allow you to take a budget and spread it over a few horses. Let’s use an example investment of $40,000. This budget can get you ownership shares in three or four horses with West Point, maybe more. On your own at the exclusive sales like Fasig-Tipton, OBS, and Keeneland September, that price is going to get you one horse at the lower end of the sale, and doesn’t include any built-in training costs like our model does.  So, with a partnership, you have the power to buy a higher-quality horse, and more of them, for your budget.

Con: Limited Selection - About 23,000 foals were born in 2011. The WPT buying team will run their hands and eyes over a few hundred of them at the various sales before narrowing it down to the best athletes; the ones we want to run under the black and gold silks. We purchase around 25 horses per year, and those are then syndicated to our Partners. When you buy with WPT, you’re limited to the horses that we select from the sale. This can be either a positive or a negative depending on your level of experience in selecting top-quality racehorses. You can read a bit more about who buys the racehorses for West Point Thoroughbreds here.

Pro: Fewer Bills, Consolidated Costs - When you own a fraction of a horse, you only have to worry about a fraction of the maintenance costs. We build in the training costs through the 2-year-old season, and after that each Partner is responsible for their ownership percentage of their horses’ maintenance.  Five percent of a training bill is a lot friendlier on the wallet than 100%. Overall, this key principle is paramount: with a partnership you have lower risk  - but also lower reward. You pay a fraction of the bills, and you receive your fraction of the purse earnings.

Con: Some Additional Costs - Believe me, it’s less expensive overall to own a horse with a partnership than it is on your own, but with a partnership you can expect some additional costs that a sole owner does not have. For example, you will have to pay an administrative fee.  Additionally, WPT takes a percentage of the purse earnings. Lastly, our horses are marked up. This is how we pay our employees and run the administrative side of the business. Please refer to our pricing structure blog for more information about this topic.

Pro: The Best Trainers - There’s strength in numbers. As I mentioned, we buy about 25 horses each year.  We employ trainers to condition those horses.  If you buy a horse on your own, it can be challenging to find a top trainer willing to take on only one horse. Additionally, these horsemen know we buy top-quality thoroughbreds, and they want to train them. We are reputable on all fronts: performance, business, and horse quality.  Read more about our team of trainers here.

Con: Limited Control and Limited Access to Your Trainer - In a partnership, you’ll be relying on the management decisions of other people, the racing managers. These decisions include trainer selection, competition circuit, race targets, and time off.  The key point here, just like in all of racing, is past performances. Who is the manager (for WPT, it is Terry Finley) and what is his or her track record?

You want to see that the manager has campaigned successful horses, and has been able to retain partners over many years.  Take a look at our Accomplishments page to see some stats about the black and gold. While WPT Partners do enjoy exclusive access to our trainers via backstretch visits and private conference calls, the amount of individual face-time can be different than someone who owns a horse on their own.  With over 500 Partners nationwide, it is difficult for our trainers to make time for each and every one. However, many of our Partners have had memorable experiences meeting and talking with the trainer of their horses.  

Pro: It’s Fun! - Why does anyone get involved in racing?  For fun, for competition, for the thrill of victory. At WPT, we strive to provide the ownership experience at the highest levels for a fraction of the cost. We take away the headaches of billing and administration, buy the best horses we can, and put them with the most talented and proven trainers.  All so that our Partners can enjoy the ride of a lifetime.  

Con: Crowded Winner’s Circles - This is my favorite negative aspect to discuss! What a great problem to have:  too many happy people in the winner’s circle.  Personally, this is not an issue for me; I think of WPT like a big family, and I love when Partners bring their families to share in their passion and excitement. Of course, if you own a horse on your own, you can be the star of the win photo. With a partnership, if you own 10%, you should expect at least 19 other people in that photo if you win on a weekend or at Saratoga or Del Mar. WPT issues guidelines in our Partner handbook: each owner can bring one guest into the winner’s circle, and we generally discourage Partners who do not own the horse from going into the winner’s circle.

I chuckled when people were able to buy tiny shares of the Green Bay Packers – our Partners have been owning and experiencing much more than that for 20 years! It’s like being involved in the ownership of a pro sports team without risking your entire life fortune - and I love to watch people live their racing dreams at WPT!
 
More Questions about owning a Thoroughbred in partnership? Interested in getting involved?  I’d love to talk horses with you. Shoot me a note at [email protected] or give me a ring at (518)-583-6638.
Disabled
TBellhouse
May 22 2013 - 9:28am
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88107
/news-and-blog/blog/2013/05/22/four-pros-and-cons-of-owning-with-a-racing-partnership
9 am on May 22, 2013
Partnerships allow thousands of people to get involved in owning a racehorse for a fraction of the cost of doing it on their own.  I’d love to tell you there’s not a single drawback to going this route, but it’s true that racing partnerships aren’t for everyone. The question is not “are partnerships the best way to own a racehorse?” The real question is: “is a partnership the best way for me to have the greatest ownership experience?” In this post I’m going to outline a few pros and cons of owning with West Point Thoroughbreds.  It is up to you to assess whether the positives outweigh the negatives.  Of course, I hope they do for you!
TBellhouse
TBellhouse's picture
72

The decision to become involved in Thoroughbred racehorse ownership is very exciting. It can open up a whole new world to you and your family and friends.

Over the next several months, I’ll be posting a series of blogs with common questions I get from prospective owners.

I hope you enjoy the series. Feel free to leave a comment or question below or shoot me an email at [email protected].

 

What are the pros and cons of owning a racehorse in a partnership?

Our COO, Tom Bellhouse, blogs about the pros and cons of owning a Thoroughbred racehorse in a partnership. I’d say the number 1 pro is diversification -- you can spread your money across multiple horses, increasing your chances of owning the “home run” horse. Number 1 con for people is limited control.

 

I’ve been on your website, I’m interested in learning more, what’s the next step?

Don’t be afraid to reach out to us! If you’re interested in becoming a Thoroughbred racehorse owner, whether it’s now, a year from now, or further down the line, we’re here to answer your questions. Reach out to [email protected] and we’ll be happy to schedule a teleconference with one of our team members.

There’s no pressure. We encourage you to do your homework and ask any partnership you’re dealing with the tough questions. We’re not for everyone, but we pride ourselves in transparency, integrity, and excellent customer service.

 

Why do you charge a markup?

I often chuckle when people hang a shingle, call themselves a partnership, and proclaim they don’t charge a markup. I can assure you that’s not reality. As the old adage goes, “you get what what you pay for.”

As I discuss in this blog post, there’s value in sitting back, and enjoying the experience of watching your horse compete without worrying about extensive operational details. You benefit from dealing with experts in the industry with vast institutional knowledge and proven racetrack performance.

 

I want to do this, but my spouse is reluctant. Do you have any advice?

Click here to read a post about how racing brought Partner Fred O’Dell and his family together. The beautiful part about racing is that every member of your family and be involved and have fun with it. Bring your reluctant significant other out for a magical morning on the backside, and I think you’ll both be be surprised.

 

Click here to view all of our blog posts.

I welcome your comment and thoughts.

Terry
 

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Jacquelyn (not verified)
Jun 16 2014 - 7:52am
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95426
/news-and-blog/blog/2013/05/22/4-common-questions-prospective-horse-owners-ask-me-about-racing-partnerships
9 am on May 22, 2013

The decision to become involved in Thoroughbred racehorse ownership is very exciting. It can open up a whole new world to you and your family and friends.

Over the next several months, I’ll be posting a series of blogs with common questions I get from prospective owners.

I hope you enjoy the series. Feel free to leave a comment or question below or shoot me an email at [email protected].

tfinley
tfinley's picture
43

Flew into Louisville yesterday afternoon. Got shoes shined before leaving the airport (a Terry Finley tradition for the last 15 years during Derby Week).


Went to the Race for Grace charity function last night and saw Ray Lewis of the Ravens speak. The event raised well over $30,000 for backstretch workers in Kentucky.

 

Watched our filly train this morning at about 8:30. Nice and easy gallop. She is sitting on ready. What a beautiful group of colts and fillies for this year's Oaks & Derby. Click here to see a video of her galloping.


Working on tickets and paddock passes and accommodations for our Partners who begin arriving on Wednesday.  


This is the week we've been waiting for. Draw was at 11:30 today. Flashy Gray drew post 10 of 11 -- just fine.  We should be free and clear going into the first turn. We know our filly loves the Churchill Downs surface.


Headed to the Derby Trainers Dinner tonight. Our good friend Dallas Stewart got his horse in the Derby field just yesterday. The numbers say Golden Soul has a shot.  


We've had a at least one horse with Dallas for the last 17 years.  We've watched each others kids grew up -- pretty neat.


Terry

 

P.S. Be sure to follow us on Twitter for real time updates throughout the rest of the week.





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Disabled
DLenert
Apr 30 2013 - 8:52pm
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95088
/news-and-blog/blog/2013/04/30/oaks-draw-good-luck-to-a-good-friend
3 pm on April 30, 2013

Flew into Louisville yesterday afternoon. Got shoes shined before leaving the airport (a Terry Finley tradition for the last 15 years during Derby Week).


Went to the Race for Grace charity function last night and saw Ray Lewis of the Ravens speak. The event raised well over $30,000 for backstretch workers in Kentucky.

tfinley
tfinley's picture
43

We caught up with Debbie Finley, Chief Administrative Officer for West Point Thoroughbreds, during Oaks week and asked her some questions about the Oaks and why it is so special to her.

Q: Why do you want to win the Kentucky Oaks, the Lilies for the Fillies, more than any other race? DF: I think people are surprised when they ask me what race I would love to win and I respond, the Kentucky Oaks. I have always wanted to win it. West Point Thoroughbreds has had some very nice fillies/mares in our racing partnerships over the years that have made us proud. A win on Friday would be such a tribute to some of those gals; Irish Smoke, Lear's Princess, Dream Rush, Justwhistledixie, Belle of the Hall, Regal Miss Copelan, and our first great filly, Big City Bound. There are countless others I have fond memories of as well. It's something about a filly that she always keeps a special place in your heart.

The Oaks is also important to me because of breast cancer awareness. To watch the survivors parade prior to the Oaks and to see how the fans support these cancer survivors is truly heartwarming -- it’s a great cause.

Congie DeVito and I talked about winning the Oaks all the time, so he’s another big part of why I want to win it. I have very fond memories of being at Churchill Downs with Congie. To win the Oaks, would truly be a wonderful tribute to my dear friend Congie, who passed away two years ago.

Finally, one of our trainers, Dallas Stewart, won the Oaks back in 2006 with Lemons Forever. I remember Dallas winning this race and being very proud of his team for a job well done. Seeing the big smile on Dallas' face was such a thrill for me!


Q: When you launched West Point Thoroughbreds in 1991 with your husband, Terry, did you ever imagine you'd be participating in one of the greatest American sporting events at Churchill Downs? DF: When we started WPT in 1991, I always believed we would have this opportunity. If you believe and dream enough....dreams do come true. We have such as outstanding team of people working for WPT that I truly think we all thought from the start it would come true.


Q: Do you have any pre-race rituals or superstitions? DF: No pre-race rituals or superstitions. I just say a prayer that they all come home safely. I tend to be very calm and do not think much about the race until that day. I leave the worrying to everyone else!


Q: What is the one accessory you absolutely will not be able to live without on Oaks Day? DF: Well, it’s not an accessory, but I cannot live without my family. My husband Terry will be there of course. My daughter, Erin who works for WPT as well, and her fiance Daniel will be right there with me. We’re hitting the road to Churchill Downs from Columbus, OH (where my son plays for the Columbus Crew) as soon as practice is over Friday morning. I could not imagine not sharing this day without them.


Q: You experienced the run for the roses with West Point's first Derby starter, Flashy Bull in 2006. Not coincidentally Flashy Bull is the sire of Flashy Gray! What did that Derby experience teach you about competing at the highest levels, and what advice do you have for Flashy Gray Partners to maximize their magical experience of having a filly in the Oaks? DF: Being in the Derby that year with Flashy Bull taught me to enjoy every moment of the ride. Things may not go perfectly as planned, but you just have to take a moment and breath in the Kentucky air and take it all in stride. It's such a magical ride these horses take us on and we are very, very fortunate to get this far with them in their careers.

It is such an honor to have one of Flashy Bull's daughters in the KY Oaks. I can remember the day he left us to board the van to head to KY to become a stallion. He walked up the ramp and he looked back at us. At that moment I said to myself, one day one of your babies is going to take us to the big dance my friend!!!  

11
Disabled
Nancy L Reagan (not verified)
May 1 2013 - 10:02am
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95085
/news-and-blog/blog/2013/04/28/why-debbie-finley-wants-to-win-the-kentucky-oaks-more-than-any-other-race
8 pm on April 28, 2013

We caught up with Debbie Finley, Chief Administrative Officer for West Point Thoroughbreds, during Oaks week and asked her some questions about the Oaks and why it is so special to her.

DLenert
DLenert's picture
415

Five days out. Can't wait. Oaks looking like the deepest and most competitive Oaks in decades.

Every time I turn around there is another "freak". Today it was Baffert's good filly, Midnight Lucky, who outworked Code West. They all can't run huge on Friday afternoon.

Getting packed to go to Louisville in the am. Have a direct flight out of Philly on Monday at 9:45 am.

Shannon Castagnola has done an awesome job over the last several weeks getting accommodations for all the Flashy Partners. Not an easy task but she's really gotten a ton of help from Becky Reed in the Churchill Premium Seating office.

Love that fact that Twitter is so useful in the buildup for big races now in the racing industry. You can follow our Twitter feed  to get real time updates and photos of our filly. Owners, trainers, horses, press, fans, tracks, riders - you name it - seems like everyone has a Twitter feed and an opinion....

Share photos on twitter with Twitpic

Will blog all week about what I'm seeing on the ground at Churchill. Jeff Lifson, our man with a plan from Louisville has been on the ground for over three weeks as the Derby MoJo started to build.

As of today, my Derby horse is Orb. Tommy Bellhouse thinks I stole the pick from him. Truth be told, he's been an Orb fan since his first start in Saratoga. Word is that Orb is in another zone these days in his training under the Twin Spires.

I think we are in with a big shot with Flashy Gray in the Oaks. However, I'm biased.

 

Click here to watch her final work in preparation for the Oaks. 

Disabled
tfinley
Apr 28 2013 - 7:54pm
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95071
/news-and-blog/blog/2013/04/28/five-days-out-until-kentucky-oaks-with-flashy-gray
7 pm on April 28, 2013

Five days out. Can't wait. Oaks looking like the deepest and most competitive Oaks in decades.

tfinley
tfinley's picture
43

We all have experiences with and memories of a racehorse who defined extraordinary. I don’t recall a lot about Broad Brush from his racing days, but I sure wish I did after reading this article by Steve Haskin, a man who is so fortunate to have had so many encounters with extraordinary horses.

Broad Brush is the broodmare sire of our newly acquired 3-year-old Ground Transport who’s pointing towards the Louisiana Derby. I’ll have to ask Mike Stidham if GT likes to ride in vans.

What are some of your brushes with extraordinary horses? 

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DLenert
Mar 23 2013 - 8:58pm
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/news-and-blog/blog/2013/03/21/what-are-your-brushes-with-extraordinary-racehorses
8 am on March 21, 2013

We all have experiences with and memories of a racehorse who defined extraordinary. I don’t recall a lot about Broad Brush from his racing days, but I sure wish I did after reading this article by Steve Haskin, a man who is so fortunate to have had so many encounters with extraordinary horses.

DLenert
DLenert's picture
415

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