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I've been in a Thanksgiving-induced reflective mood over the holiday weekend, thinking of the past, present and future concurrently. Old friends, opportunities gained and lost, past decisions made and new ones yet to be made... lots of stuff.

With weighty thoughts bouncing around in my head, I gravitated to something more enjoyable to ponder - my first time!
 
It was September 15, 1993, and it happened at Belmont Park. Exactly two weeks earlier I had signed an agreement to obtain a fractional interest in a horse owned by West Point Thoroughbreds. They were a fledgling organization (to be kind) at the time and I decided to take the plunge on a horse named Out of the Realm. He was recently claimed for $35,000 by WP after a filly they had owned was claimed away from them for the same amount. For historical accuracy, her name was Miss Pocket Court.

My boss and I took the afternoon off from work in New York City to make the relatively short drive to Belmont. We stood in the paddock with the horse, took pictures, watched him being saddled and then "jockeys up!" Pinch me if I'm really here!

A mile and three eights on the turf, non-winners of 3 other than, with my newly-acquired NY-bred colt. In 1993 the purse was $34,000 but New York State-breds ran for a 50% bonus to stimulate breeding in the State (a program that has had spectacular results over the ensuing years, culminating with 2003 Kentucky Derby winner Funny Cide), so we were actually running for an effective $51,000 purse with the bonus. In those days I expect WP founder and President Terry Finley was wondering if he and his company would ever win a purse of that magnitude. No really - EVER!

The gates opened and Realm took his usual position at the rear of the field. He was 6 to 1, had Chris Antley aboard, and was the reason my heart was pounding almost out of my chest. On the far turn he starts a move that was breathtaking. Now I'm both about to have my heart explode and I can't breath in the same moment. "Down the stretch they come...and here comes Out of the Realm gaining with every stride." He veers in deep stretch but finishes two lengths in front at the wire. Stunned silence, then explosive cheering from the group of partners bearing witness.

Stewards inquiry, followed too quickly by a jockeys objection from the second-place finisher! "Oh shucks," or some other comments of that type. This combination of inquiry and objection was the kiss of death in New York racing at that time. It seemed to me that there would be about a 10-15 percent chance we would stay up, since the jockey on the second place horse did very acutely and dramatically pull up on his horse as we passed. I'm in the winners circle already wondering if I should be praying, crying, or just passing out. Chris Antley walks two feet in front of me, looks directly in my eyes and asks, "How did it look?" My immediate response was, "I think you were well clear (of the other horse)!" Antley gets on the phone and relates to the stewards, "I'm sure I was well clear..."

We stay up! We start to drink and keep arguing, for an hour or so, about who will buy the next round. Everyone was buying that day! God bless his soul, Chris Antley at his best was among the great jockeys of all time. He was the best jockey in the world that day for sure.

When Sunrise Smarty won the Grade 3 "Fall Highweight Handicap" on Thursday at Aqueduct, adding yet another graded stakes victory to the now-extensive ledger of WPT, I was thinking of his Partners and how they felt about his stunningly spectacular performance. From Out of the Realm to Sunrise Smarty, there have been countless unforgettable moments. Stay tuned for the next one, it could happen at any time!
 
This is me in the winner's circle after Ethan Man won the 2002 Swale Stakes at Gulfstream. He's one of several very talented horses I've owned with West Point:
 
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JCrews
Nov 30 2011 - 9:15am
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/news-and-blog/blog/2011/11/29/you-always-remember-your-first-timein-the-winners-circle
4 pm on November 29, 2011

I've been in a Thanksgiving-induced reflective mood over the holiday weekend, thinking of the past, present and future concurrently. Old friends, opportunities gained and lost, past decisions made and new ones yet to be made... lots of stuff.

With weighty thoughts bouncing around in my head, I gravitated to something more enjoyable to ponder - my first time!
Anonymous's picture
Blog
You Always Remember Your First Time....In The Winner's Circle

THOROUGHBRED RACING PARTNERSHIPS: AN OVERVIEW

Thanks to the creation of racing partnerships, Thoroughbred ownership is no longer restricted to elite members of society. A partnership (or “syndicate”) is an easy and affordable way for both new and experienced owners to get involved with the Sport of Kings. These groups provide a great opportunity to experience all the thrills of horse racing at a fraction of the cost when you join a syndicate.

HOW OWNERSHIP WITH A PARTNERSHIP WORKS
The management team is responsible for purchasing top-quality horses privately and at sales as yearlings or 2-year-olds. Potential owners are then invited to invest or “buy-in” on horses. They can get involved on their own or with a group of friends, and have the option to determine their level of participation. The minimum investment cost (decided by the management team) usually varies with each horse. Obviously, the more horses you’re involved in, the better your chances will be to hoist a victory trophy. You also limit risk by diversifying your investment over multiple horses so if a horse can no longer compete, there are others who are capable and maintain your participation.

ADVANTAGES & PERKS OF OWNING WITH A RACING SYNDICATE
Just because you aren’t the sole owner of a horse doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the advantages and perks of full ownership. Racing syndicates take away the financial stress of participating in the game because costs such as training, veterinary expenses, insurance, racing fees, etc. are managed by the partnership. It is the management team’s responsibility to deal with trainers, horses, and racing on a day-to-day basis. However, partners in a syndicate are still given a voice on certain key decisions. For example, West Point Partners vote on issues specified in the partner agreement, such as whether a horse should be dropped into the claiming ranks for the first time or offered for sale. Partners also vote on the expenditure of large sums of capital.

In most partnerships, partners get full access to the stable area and paddock, the chance to meet the trainer(s), and an opportunity to meet jockeys. Another perk of premier partnerships is raceday dining or seating for you and your family and friends at the track. Another major perk of a partnership is a chance to meet fellow owners and form a camaraderie.  Owners not only spend time together at the races cheering on their horses, but also at sales and events throughout the year, such as the Kentucky Derby and the Breeders’ Cup World Championships.  

RISKS
Like all investments, there is a degree of risk involved with Thoroughbred ownership. There is no guarantee your horse will cover your initial purchase price or cover expenses. Because Thoroughbreds are professional athletes, there is a risk of injury, illness and retirement. Yes, horses are able to “pay their way,” but there is no such thing as a sure thing.  

To sum it up, racing partnerships are a great way to participate in something big at a fraction of the cost. While the number of owners on each particular horse varies, you can still have 100% of the fun.  

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NUry
Nov 22 2011 - 4:01pm
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/news-and-blog/blog/2011/11/21/what-is-a-thoroughbred-racing-partnership-how-does-it-work
9 am on November 21, 2011

THOROUGHBRED RACING PARTNERSHIPS: AN OVERVIEW

Thanks to the creation of racing partnerships, Thoroughbred ownership is no longer restricted to elite members of society. A partnership (or “syndicate”) is an easy and affordable way for both new and experienced owners to get involved with the Sport of Kings. These groups provide a great opportunity to experience all the thrills of horse racing at a fraction of the cost when you join a syndicate.

NUry
NUry's picture
8900
Blog
What is A Thoroughbred Racing Partnership & How Does It Work?

MOUNT LAUREL, NJ - Here at West Point Thoroughbreds, racing is a passion for each member of our team - and there are some pretty good stories about how everyone who works for us came to love this sport.

We’re rolling out a new bio section on the website, and we hope you get a chance to become familiar with each team member through the new profiles they wrote about themselves. We’ve included interesting facts you may not know - some “outside the box” information, if you will.

Did You Know...

I love soccer - and have been caught viewing more than one episode of Jersey Shore.

Debbie Finley loves Sundays - church, breakfast, sports, movies, family dinner and 60 Minutes.

Dawn Lenert got her owner's license when she was 13 and was a WPT Partner before she joined the management team, counting Holly Huges Stakes winner Rereadthefootnotes among her most successful horses with us.

Tom Bellhouse was only allowed to go to the races if he got straight “A”s as a youngster - and took horseback riding lessons in the hopes of being the next Steve Cauthen!

Jeff Liffson was a second row "scrummy" at Williams College, but escaped with his face and bone structure pretty much intact.

Erin Finley has owned six off-the-track horses and has participated in the sport of three-day-eventing since middle school, competing through the CCI* level.

Shannon Castagnola found herself in horse heaven after her family moved to Lexington, Ky, when she was eight - and from that moment on, life was about Saturday morning riding lessons, showing at local county fairgrounds, and working as a riding instructor at a local summer day camp during college.

Lindsey Heumann started to ride at such an early age, she had to stand on a chair to put the saddle on her horse.

Clifton Hickock was a Partner in WPT’s first stakes winner (Big City Bound), first graded stakes winner (Ethan Man) and first Kentucky Derby entrant and subsequently first Grade 1 winner (Flashy Bull) - not to mention about 65 total winner’s circle photos in his collection.

 

 

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Anonymous
Nov 18 2011 - 12:52pm
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/news-and-blog/blog/2011/11/17/get-to-know-the-west-point-team
2 pm on November 17, 2011

MOUNT LAUREL, NJ - Here at West Point Thoroughbreds, racing is a passion for each member of our team - and there are some pretty good stories about how everyone who works for us came to love this sport.

We’re rolling out a new bio section on the website, and we hope you get a chance to become familiar with each team member through the new profiles they wrote about themselves. We’ve included interesting facts you may not know - some “outside the box” information, if you will.

tfinley
tfinley's picture
43
Blog
Get To Know The West Point Team

Kip Elser does what he loves to do for a living. He has been intimately involved in various components of the Thoroughbred racing business since the late 1970s. A former steeplechase rider, he expanded his resume to include horse breaking and training and sales preparation, and has enjoyed many years as a leading sales consignor while maintaining his operations at Kirkwood Stables out of the Springdale Race Course in Camden, SC.

 
This year, West Point made the decision to send all of our yearlings and layups to Kip at Kirkwood, a full-service Thoroughbred breaking and training facility equipped to develop young horses and rehabilitate horses of racing age prior to returning them to the racetrack.

Q. Where were you born and raised?
A. I was born and grew up in Paoli, Pennsylvania

Q. How did you become interested in horse racing?
A. I hunted and showed as a kid, and my dad bought a timber horse to have some fun with in the early 60s. I was about 10, and that’s what started the steeplechase riding and all that.  

Q. Who are the best horses you’ve been around?
A. I was really lucky when I was a kid in my late teens or early 20s to work for Frank Whiteley Jr., John Russell when he
had Tri Jet and Susan's Girl, and later for Lucien Lauren when he had Secretariat and Riva Ridge.

 
I was going to school at John Hopkins University for a degree in comparative literature, and Frank let me get on horses in the mornings for him before I went to school. it was in the early days of flying horses, so John wanted to be on the plane when he sent Tri Jet and Susan’s Girl East. He gave his gallop boy the car to drive East and the boy never made it - no car, no gallop boy - so I got on a few for him as well, and Lucien let me get on some early in the mornings. I worked for Frank again down here in Camden after I graduated.

They were some great, great horsemen with some incredible horses. To be around them was unbelievable. I got on Secretariat a couple of times; I wasn’t his regular gallop boy but back then there was always a day when somebody didn’t show up. There were just some really good pedigrees back then. I remember Con Game, the last of the Buckpasser fillies - what a gorgeous filly. I can see her today. She was like a classic Richard Stone Reeves painting.

Q. You’ve done particularly well with fillies, including recent stars Plum Pretty and Winter Memories. Have you made any favorites over the years?
A. My two all-time favorites are Sharp Cat and Memories of Silver. They just had such personalities. They were different from the usual horses. They didn’t necessarily train spectacularly all the time, but they had nearly-human personalities. So talented, and so smart. They were a joy to be around.
 
Q. You’re quite the world traveler. Tell us about the places you’ve gone while working with horses.
A. When I was a kid, Toby Balding in England was - and still is - very much a mentor to me. I had some wonderful experiences while working for him. He sent me all over to look at horses - France, Ireland, whenever somebody called and said, ‘I have a horse for sale’ and Toby was busy, he’d send me. That was back in the early 70s, I guess. Just a wonderful time.
 
Then about 15 years ago, we started putting groups of 2-year-olds together to sell at the breeze-up sale at Tattersalls. Over the years, that’s been wonderful experience - to train at Newmarket for a couple of weeks every spring in a completely different atmosphere and different system. We’ve had plenty of fun and a lot of good horses here, but it’s just fun to get out and do something out of the ordinary.

Q. Any recent trips?
A. I just got back from South Africa about two weeks ago. They have a very different system for their 2-year-old sales there; they have the breezes in different places. The main one is at Summerhill Stud (they’re the major consignors at the sales), and they have one at Johannesburg. They had a panel of several trainers, a couple of agents and commentators, me as a visitor, and we sat there and watched the breeze show, then had a panel discussion and gave our selections for the sale on their equivalent of the evening racing wrap-up show. It was really a cool day to sit and watch 175 horses breeze in front of you, but you’re sitting with all the leading trainers down there, then just really good agents and the head TV commentator and handicapper, just a great day.

Q. You’ve really enjoyed the chance to travel, haven’t you?
A. Well, this game will take you anywhere in the world if you let it. There are so many places where it’s all about the horses, and if you love horses and have respect for racing and how hard people have to work to get here and what goes into it, you’re welcomed with open arms all over the world.

Q. What makes your facility in Camden superior to the typical racetrack model?
A. These places were designed for the horse. They were built back in the 1930s when land price wasn’t a consideration, and neither was labor. You could design a facility however you wanted to take care of and train your horses. The other factors just weren’t there. This was and still is a superior idea. It’s a much less hectic environment focused on enabling the horse to grow and thrive and therefore reach its utmost potential.

Q. Along those lines, what’s the key to bringing a racehorse back from the layup to successful competition?
A. In the old days we called it freshening, and some people still do. These horses presumably showed something, otherwise you wouldn’t be giving them the time off and trying to bring them back - but they’ve gotten hurt where they were. So along with the physical rehab, if you’re going to freshen them, I like to do it differently than going down the horse path and getting “X” number of miles into them jogging and galloping with a rail on each side. There are only so many miles each horse has in them and if you can put varied miles in them to get to the same point, you’re saving the drilling and hard work for when they get back to the racetrack. A lot of times these horses are tired, physically and mentally, when they come here. That’s why people send them here, and it’s our job to help them get well again.

Q. Do you still ride?
A. Very little. I get on the pony occasionally.

Q. Who gets your vote for Horse of the Year?
A. I thought the Breeders’ Cup was a wonderful two days of racing, but it did more to muddy the championship scene than to clarify it this year. For a 3-year-old, that’s when you step out of your division and have to run against older horses in the Classic to seal the deal for year-end honors. When Drosselmeyer jumped up and won it, that opportunity went away, but he himself didn’t do enough this season to secure Horse of the Year honors. I can’t argue against Havre de Grace, but you could also make a good case for Tizway with him winning the Met and the Whitney, I could see that even though he missed the Breeders’ Cup due to his injury.

Honestly, I think Cape Blanco (seen right) would be a legitimate vote as well. The Europeans have the best horses in the world now, and when they send a basically top-line horse like Cape Blanco over and he does what he did, that’s impressive.

Q. What do you do in your spare time when you’re not working with horses?
A. Not a lot. This is my chosen profession, this isn’t something I do to try to make a living, then get away from. I’ll read - my favorite books are historical novels - and watch HRTV and TVG..

Q. What’s the last book you read?
A. Assegai, a historical novel about South Africa by Wilbur Smith.

Q. Where’s your favorite restaurant? You’ve been a lot of places so this one might be tough.
A. My dad told me years ago, ‘Never get room service. Every town you’re visiting, make clear end to your day, shower, change, and go find somewhere to eat.’ Saratoga Springs obviously has lots of good restaurants; Sperry’s would be the best for the longest time, but in the last few years the Beekman Street Bistro has really been enjoyable as well. Lexington has a lot more good restaurants than a lot of people give it credit for; Azur and Dudley’s are two of the top choices, but there are lots of good places there. Baltimore has some wonderful restaurants, and so does New Orleans, where I’d have to recommend a stop at Commander’s Palace. I could write a restaurant guide!

Q. Where’s your favorite non-racing vacation destination?
A. If I was forced to go somewhere not racing-related, I would go to Sun Valley, where I got on skis for the first time after 50 (and loved it), or I would go to Eleuthera Island off the coast of Florida. They’re two completely different places, but you can get TVG at both.  

Q. Does your wife Helen like horses as much as you do?
A. She does, for sure. She’s a great help to me, but she has the good sense not to work with me every day. She’s a huge help, but she keeps her sanity and mine by not being involved with the business on a daily basis.

Q. What’s the main goal at Kirkwood?
A. To do the best we can by every specific horse, and hopefully we have runners leave here -  young or old - that go on to successful careers. That’s not very complicated, but that’s what we’re trying to accomplish. With some horses we go forward day-by-day, but with other horses we select a target and work backwards, to see if we can help the horse make it there.

 

2
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DLenert
Sep 28 2012 - 4:59pm
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10 pm on November 11, 2011

Kip Elser does what he loves to do for a living. He has been intimately involved in various components of the Thoroughbred racing business since the late 1970s. A former steeplechase rider, he expanded his resume to include horse breaking and training and sales preparation, and has enjoyed many years as a leading sales consignor while maintaining his operations at Kirkwood Stables out of the Springdale Race Course in Camden, SC.

EFinley
EFinley's picture
3618
Blog
A Few Minutes With WPT Trainer Kip Elser

MOUNT LAUREL, NJ. – When the Breeders’ Cup is over, our focus turns to Eclipse Awards and the battle for Horse of the Year. We usually rely on the season finale to clarify year-end honors, but as many have written, the picture seems to be more muddled than ever coming out of this year’s World Championships.

This was the first time since 2006 that West Point Thoroughbreds was not represented by a Breeders’ Cup starter, and only the second time we’ve missed participating since 2005. I have to say, it was a really enjoyable experience to be a fan and spectator for the three days that we were at Churchill Downs. We definitely contributed to the figures that came in from across the world when the event was done – almost $190 million wagered on the 15 races.

After watching the Classic, I think it’s fair to say that Awesome Gem would have had a shot to be in the mix, knowing that Game On Dude ran so well and considering we ran second to him by just half a length one race before in the Goodwood and whooped him in the Lone Star Park Handicap in May. Game On Dude’s performance against Drosselmeyer really flattered our runner. That said, we know we did the right thing by our horse in giving him time off from racing. We think he’ll come back fresh and enthusiastic like he always does, and we look forward to his 2012 campaign.

I don’t have any clue who should be Horse of the Year. Usually you’d like to see one or two that have kind of separated themselves from the pack, but nobody’s really done that this year, and that’s what will make it difficult to choose. We’ll see some of these horses come back and run one more time in an attempt to solidify their credentials. The way it stands right now there are multiple candidates, but if you had to pin me down for a vote today, I’d give it to Havre de Grace.

Here’s another point that’s been mentioned before, but bears repeating – I think we should have some way for fans, owners, and trainers to have a say in voting for the Eclipse Awards. I think it’s unbelievable that the owners and trainers who put up all the money and “sweat equity” have no say in the voting. And let’s face it, the fans are an integral part of the sport.

People say “What about the conflict of interest?” where owners and trainers are concerned, but there are conflicts in every part of business, it’s just how you deal with them. When it comes to the Eclipse Awards, aren’t there conflicts with writers who are based in certain locations or conflicts with racing secretaries from one place or another? So make rules that the owners or trainers can’t vote for their own horses – just like in the NFL, where you can’t vote for anybody on your team for the Pro Bowl. But at least give three major contributing bodies a voice.

What’s your take?

Terry    
5
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Ed Mac (not verified)
Nov 13 2011 - 10:37am
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1 pm on November 10, 2011

MOUNT LAUREL, NJ. – When the Breeders’ Cup is over, our focus turns to Eclipse Awards and the battle for Horse of the Year. We usually rely on the season finale to clarify year-end honors, but as many have written, the picture seems to be more muddled than ever coming out of this year’s World Championships.

tfinley
tfinley's picture
43
Blog
Who's Horse of The Year? We Should Decide!

The West Point team joined together and took a crack at handicapping each of the Breeders’ Cup 2011 races. Some races are handicapped in more detail than others, but we thought you’d enjoyed the insight from each member of our team. You can view our bios by clicking here. Will Tom Bellhouse (and no the four-legged Bellhouse was not entered in the Breeders’ Cup) hit the tri in the Filly & Mare Turf? Will the three-year-old To Honor and Serve take the Classic for Bill Mott as predicted by Terry Finley?


Friday Races:

Juvenile Sprint-Lindsey Heumann and Jeff Lifson

Lindsey’s Top 4 Picks
9 – Vexor
8 – Jake Mo
6 – Secret Circle
3 – Blacky the Bull

 

Vexor:


Jeff Lifson


As many of you know, I live in Louisville--sorta gives me an unfair advantage to most in the ability to watch these BC horses train for a week or two at Churchill downs.   Also, as many of you have come to know sadly, I'm a lousy handicapper when it comes to reading the form and picking the winners of any race(most of you who ask me for picks at any given race day have learned this the hard way).  My edge is in picking the horses who are doing the best physically at the time of the race.  You can't do that for the random Thursday card at Belmont.  But you sure as shootin' can do it for BC.  So all that preamble leads to this in the BC Juvenile Sprint:

1)Secret Circle--Came in to Churchill Downs and acted like he owned the place in his first spin around the oval this week...big, heavy muscled dude is super imposing.
2)Vexor--great coat means a healthy horse, good mover over this surface
3)Seeker--did enough in the dark in his breeze to impress me.   He's got a poor post, but seems like a pro out there.

Throwout horse--Shumoos--hasn't adapted well to Churchill.  He's a candidate to get hot and bothered before the race.

 


Juvenile Fillies Turf- Casey Irving

 

Picks- 10-3-14-4

1 My Gi Gi. I’ll be passing on this longshot. Post is tricky, and she couldn’t catch them in the Oak Leaf. She is probably outmatched by these other 2 year olds.

2 Dayatthespa. I have to show some love for fellow “NY bred” Chad Brown, who grew upin nearby Mechanicville, NY. Chad is having an amazing year, and I would be delighted for him to notch a BC victory to cap off 2011. This horse loved going 5 ½ at Saratoga this summer, winning first time out. She couldn’t hold the pace late going a mile in her next start, albeit against G3 competition and her first time facing winners. Her run in the Natalma was impressive, but fell short. I won’t be picking her, but I won’t be upset if she upsets.

3 Up (IRE) Something about a Euro shipper in for a BC turf race just seems right to me. I’d love this longshot take it all, but the beastly Elusive Kate will be a challenge. There is a lot of mystery here, the horse only has 2 starts and hasn’t faced anything more than Maidens until this point. I have faith that Aidan O’Brien knows he has a loaded gun here given her lack of PP’s. That’s why they call it gambling, right?

4 Stopshoppingmaria. Can’t argue with the facts here. We have seen time and time again that More Than Ready offspring love the grass. And team Pletcher-Repole is always a tough play against with young horses in the big time races. My Miss Aurelia made short work of her in the Frizette, and I think the Europeans will best her here.

5 Stephanie’s Kitten. Despite obvious and impressive talent, nothing about this horse really excites me. She is consistent, hitting the board 4 for 4 and winning twice. She has won at both a mile and a mile and sixteenth, so the distance should suit her perfectly. She ran great in the Alcibiadies, and I’ll probably kick myself for not including her, but other horses just tug at my heart strings a little more. (Josh Cooper tells me bad gamblers bet with their hearts, instead of their heads, oh well.)

6 Sweet Cat. The second Pletcher entry lost to Somali Lemonade in her last start. Johnny V clearly feels better about his chances on Stephanie’s Kitten and I think I’d have to agree with him.

7 Royal Bonnie. This longshot broke her maiden first time out going long at Saratoga. She’s only had two career starts and doesn’t come from a super impressive pedigree. Friend of WPT Dan Collins runs Bonaventure Stables, so we will all be rooting for Dan here, and I love George Weaver, but will be passing on my personal ticket.

8 Hard Not to Like. Funny, I say this to people about ME all the time! Another consistent campaigner, having won at 6f, a mile, and a mile and a sixteenth. Overall I think she is outmatched, as she is facing both Dayatthespa and Stephanie’s Kitten after having lost to them in the G3 Natalma.

9 Pure Gossip. Interesting horse who has won on both turf and dirt, she’s got bug boy Curatolo who has done some nice things with Serpe. But overall I don’t think we will see any great

shakes from her.


10 Elusive Kate (seen at right). One glance at her PP’s and its clear she is the real deal. Her combination of pedigree, coming off four wins in a row, and being a Euro shipper seal her as the pick for me, as well as many others. The 2-1 ML favorite.

 

11 Ann of the Dance. First start since her trainer change from James DiVito. She has shown some talent at this distance but I do not think she will wind up in the winner’s circle.

12 Dear Lavinia. A long shot I almost picked for an upset. I love the European angle, as I mentioned, and I would love for Bobby Flay to capture another BC victory (and then grill me up something delicious.) I don’t think she will take down Elusive Kate, but I wouldn’t call you crazy if you put her deep in the exotics.

13. Customer Base. Coming off 2 wins in as many starts, this filly looks to have a promising career ahead of her. She hasn’t raced on turf (synthetic only) which presents a slight wildcard. I’m passing on her but could see the argument for her to go 3 for 3.

14. Somali Lemonade. Another hard one to play against. Lemon Drop Kid line has shown a lot on the grass, and this filly is coming off 2 wins in 2 starts. I don’t love the post, which is why I put her third, if she continues to improve as she has done from race to race, she could be sitting on a big effort.

Filly & Mare Sprint- Dawn Lenert


 
1) Turbulent Descent (seen at left)- Will take the 3yo chalk here. 3 for 3 at 7 panels and multiple G1 wins.
2) Tar Heel Mom - Flatter mare is 24 for 30 lifetime hitting the board, including at CD, and likes the distance.
3) Pomeroy’s Pistol - Beat older in G2 Gallant Bloom last and posts consistently solid numbers.
 
Juvenile Fillies- Shannon Castagnola

My Miss Aurelia (seen at right) - a $550,000 Keeneland September yearling purchase by SMART STRIKE out of a Storm Cat mare. You can't go wrong when you've named a horse after your mom. I'm a mom, I love moms! This undefeated filly has proven she can be a tough New York girl by winning the Grade II Adirondack at Saratoga and the Grade I Frizette at Belmont. She'll need to call on her Kentucky roots though if she's going to win at historic Churchill Downs.

Weemissfrankie - I'm a sucker for a story. The owners of this filly used to be a triumvirate who wouldn't spend more than $50,000 or $60,000 at the sale on an individual. One of the partners passed away and the remaining two continued to purchase horses. They named this filly in honor of their friend, but also because they spent $150,000 on her, something "Frankie" never would have let them do! It's proven to be a winning decision though as she's undefeated and twice a Grade 1 winner. She's also proven she can run on anything, she's won on the cushion track at Hollywood, the polytrack at Del Mar and the dirt track at Santa Anita. She won her first time out defeating our own Lady Fairbanks who we think quite a bit of.

Putthebabiesdown - there's a lot to like here. She's bred by Highclere and I have a sentimental connection to the farm as one of the sons, Stuart Morris, is a great guy, a good friend and a groomsmen in my wedding 9 years ago. She's trained by Kenny McPeek, so believe me, she knows Churchill Downs. This will be just another day at the office for her.


Filly & Mare Turf- Tom Bellhouse

Fascinating race... Take your pick of any of these three Euros
 
*Stacelita has been dominant  since arriving in the US and training great for Chad Brown.  She did lose to Announce at Longchamp, when both faced the colts, in the Group-3 La Coupe.  Versatility is a big edge, as there is not a ton of pace in the race outside of Dynaslew and rail horse, Dubawi Heights.  The filly seems capable of sitting just off the leaders if the pace dictates.  Leading US rider Ramon Dominguez has the return call.

*Nahrain is undefeated for Sheik Mo going 4 for 4 in a lightly raced career.  Defeating the previously mentioned Announce by a nose in their last meeting on Oct 2nd
International superstar, Frankie Dettori will pilot this English bred daughter of Selkirk.

*Announce is trained by the legendary Andre Fabre for the familar pink and green of Juddmonte Farm.  This filly is 8 for 10 lifetime in the exacta and has faced colts, as well as fillies in two of her last four starts.  Announce was beaten a nose, as the favorite, by Nahrain in the Group-1 Qatar Prix de L’Opera at Longchamp, in her last race.  Distance and turf condition don’t seem to be a concern for this amazing filly.

Tommy’s Pick
1.  Announce
2.  Stacelita (seen at left)
3.  Nahrain
4.  Dubawi Heights

 
 
I think Announce and Stacelita lead a calvary charge of late runners, with the Juddmonte homebred (Announce) getting the nod.  I don’t think turf condition or distance will be an issue for either of my top two selections.  Nahrain is obviously undefeated and is a budding superstar, but I believe she might be compromised by the distance.  Nahrain may be closer to the pace than in previous races, if the fractions are not solid.  Dubawi Heights potentially could share an easy lead with Dynaslew in the early going, and scoot away under Rosario to pick up part of the triple.  In an effort to support full disclosure- WPT trainer Graham Motion said his filly, defending champ Shared Account, “is coming this years BC in the best shape of her career.”

Ladies’ Classic-Debbie Finley

My Picks are:
#8 Plum Pretty 2-1
#6 Royal Delta 5-2
#3 It's Tricky 5-1

Going with the favorites.
Like Plum Pretty because she likes Churchill Downs and won the KY Oaks there. Good trainer/jock combo. Pictured below.
Royal Delta: Was impressive winning the Alabama at Saratoga.
It's Tricky: New rider, Ramon Dominguez who I think will give this filly a good ride. She shows she can hang with fillies like Plum Pretty and Royal Delta.

If anyone upsets the apple cart it could be Ask the Moon.
 



Saturday Races:

Marathon- Clif Hickok

# 8 Giant Oak (pictured)has made up tons on ground, in past races, on the Churchill dirt. He looks in better shape now than in last years Marathon. # 7 Eldaafer won this race last year and Marathon winners tend to repeat. # 6 Cease is lightly raced and stepping up. I like his last three races and War Chant as a distance sire, in with a shot. You have to love a horse that is CUTTING BACK to a 1.75 mile race! # 5 Brigantin's last race was at 2.5 miles, love that angle!!

$2 EX and TRI boxes on 5, 6, 7, 8 Total bet $72.

Juvenile Turf- Erin Finley
1. Finale- Pletcher trainee undefeated on the turf. Run two “9”s on the Sheets on the turf, which makes him very tough to beat. If he relaxes and harnesses his speed early, I think he’s the clear cut winner. Pictured right.

2. Animal Spirits- Has some improving to do based on the numbers, but was impressed with his win in the Bourbon. Lacks experience, but I think he’s right there with another step forward. A firm turf course likely plays to his advantage.

3. Lucky Chappy (IRE)- Broke slowly and trailed early in the Bourbon before really coming at the leaders late. With a better trip, I think he’ll have a better chance to show his talent. Dominguez sticks with State of Play though. Interesting, because State of Play’s numbers aren’t too strong despite being undefeated and he hasn’t run since Saratoga.

I think Majestic City is going to be overbet. First time turf and he was very, very rank last time out. I don’t think you win a race like this unless you can relax.

Sprint- Josh Cooper

Win- Aikenite (pictured left) - Stabled at Churchill for the fall, acclimated to the environment, and pattern suggests this could be a big effort (negative here is that John Velazquez went elsewhere)
Place - Amazombie - At his best distance, Mike Smith a big money rider, shows the ability to string together big efforts
Show - Force Freeze - Very solid since coming to the states, wish he would have brought him to Churchill a few weeks ago as opposed to trying win from Monmouth Park

Turf Sprint- Erin Finley

1. Perfect Officer (pictured at right)- I think this is a horse on the improve. Six for 18 at the distance. Run well on a good turf course before and there’s a good chance the course isn’t firm come Saturday due to rain. Think he’s going to be a price horse, but has run some numbers that put him right in the mix.

2. Regally Ready-Coming off gate to wire win in Nearctic at Woodbine gong six furlongs last time out. He’ll try to play catch me if you can. You would think there would be more speed in here. This horse is two for four at the distance.

3. Havelock- Four for six at the distance. He’s run well from off the pace and also from closer up, and I like that versatility in a race like this.


Dirt Mile- Erin Finley

I hit the super a few years back in the Mile at Santa Anita with Goldikova on top. Here’s my superfecta for the 2011 Dirt Mile:

7-9-5-8 That’s Jersey Town, Trappe Shot, Wilburn, Caleb’s Posse

1. The Factor
Thanks, but no thanks. Don’t like the inside post. Never been a huge fan of this horse. Inside speed and don’t think he wants any parts of a mile.

2. Shackleford
I’m a big Dale Romans fan, but I just don’t think this race sets up for him unless he shows an ability rate. There’s just too much speed.

3. Tapizar
Ambitious spot second time off the layoff. Ran a career best Rag number last time out. I think he is overmatched.

4. Tres Borrachos
Zero for six on conventional dirt. Pass.

5. Wilburn
Three-year-old is looking for fourth straight win. Worked well over this surface, and has run some good numbers lately without going over the top. Four for six on conventional dirt. He doesn’t win it, but he hits the board.

6. Irrefutable
Ran two huge Rag numbers earlier this year which makes him intriguing. However, his work coming into the race was apparently so-so. Coming off a big effort in California, but just don’t see him winning.

7. Jersey Town
Being a Jersey girl, this is not only my sentimental pick but I 
truly like this horse and think he’s got a big shot to 
win. Although he hasn’t won this year, he’s hit the board in three starts. There’s a good amount of speed in here, and think he’ll have a stalking trip. Know he doesn’t have a ton of number power and untried over the surface, but a gut feel here. And for the record, I did pick him prior to Len Friedman giving him out on our Partner Ragozin call! :)

8. Caleb’s Posse
Race could set up for this three-year-old closer since there’s quite a bit of speed. Fairly consistent pattern this year. One for four at the distance though. I expect him to be running late, but think he’ll have to settled for closing out the super.

9. Trappe Shot
Very talented horse that has run some tremendous numbers. He’s got the running style to be a force in here. I didn’t love his last race though. Although he ran a good number, he flattened out down the lane. Picked him to complete the exacta, but he’ll need to step up from the Vosburgh that’s for sure.


Turf- Nancy Ury

 
6. Await the Dawn - this son of Giant's Causeway is one of two Aiden O'Brien starters in the Turf.  Gets first Lasix on Breeders' Cup day.  Just fared ok when he faced G1 company (for the first time) last out in the Juddmonte International in August.  He has made five trips to the winners circle out of just 7 starts.  I love the fact that O'Brien has entrusted jockey Julien Leparoux with the mount. Trainer Aiden O'Brien also sports some impressive stats in terms of horses making their North American debut - 38%.  Is 30% with first Lasix, and a whopping 46% on the Turf.

 
2. Sarafina (FR) - is one of two girls in the bunch. Throw out her last race in the Prix de l'Arc dr Triomphe (G1), prior to that she was on a 3 race win streak. She has experience against the boys so she can handle the tough competition. She's 60% in the win column in her 10 lifetime starts. Coming in to Breeders' Cup she is 3rd start off a freshening which an angle I've always liked. Trainer Alain De Royer-Dupre is not only 33% with horses making their 1st start in North America, and also shares that number on the turf and graded stakes.

7. Sea Moon (GB) - is just one of two 3yos in the field and the most lightly raced in the bunch.  He had a tough trip last out in the Ladbrokes St. leger in September to finish 3rd - his worst performance to date. He will also get first Lasix on raceday.  I like the fact that jockey Ryan Moore is making the trip and back on for trainer Sir Michael Stoute.  He rode him in his first 3 lifetime starts to a second and 2 wins.  Sea Moon has never been off the board in his 5 starts.


Juvenile- Tom Bellhouse

First question you have ask yourself when handicapping this race is: Can you beat the undefeated, ultra impressive Union Rags?

This precocious son of Dixie Union splashed home in the Spa slop to win the G-2 Saratoga Special and followed that up with a troubled trip victory in the G-1 Champagne at Belmont.  He showed amazing versatility by winning off the pace in both his debut and Champagne victories, as well as wiring the field in The Special.  His trainer, Michael Matz, has been to a big dance before at Churchill with the mighty Barbaro and his rider, JJ Castellano is a big time money rider.


If your answer is “YES,” then let me add a few tidbits to this 1000 piece jigsaw puzzle.

-Six of the thirteen entries have never run on a dirt surface, with an

additional three colts making their second start on dirt.

-Union Rags, Alpha, Speightscity, Creative Cause, and the very sneaky Calder horse- Fort Loudon (from the same connections as Awesome Feather) are the only colts with a victory over the dirt,in their brief careers.

-Take Charge Indy’s pedigree (AP Indy-Take Charge Lady) gives him total license to love the dirt and run all day long.

-Darley Stables’ Alpha, the Kiaran McLaughlin trained, Bernadini homebred ran one of the most impressive maiden scores of the Saratoga meet, in his debut.   He was not disgraced running a green second to Union Rags in the Champagne, in only his second career start.

-Optimizer, the impressive son of freshmen sire English Channel, is trained by Hall of Famer D. Wayne Lukas and would have been my dark horse pick if he had run in the Juvenile Turf, but picks a strange spot to test the dirt.

-Hansen, the Mike Maker trained, Tapit homebred who hasn’t finished in the same zip code as his competition in his two starts at Turfway.

-Aidan O’Brien brings two colts to the Juvenile.  Both own two victories in their young careers and both have never tried anything other than turf????

-WPT trainers, Dale Romans and Mark Casse, both bring exciting prospects in Dullahan & Prospective to the race in great form.....just to muddy the waters

-Strange but true.....Todd Pletcher does not have a two year old colt in the 2011 Breeders Cup Juvenile (How can that be??)


Tommy’s Pick


1.  Creative Cause- (pictured) son of Giant’s Causeway moves forward

2.  Union Rags- hoping I’m wrong

3.  Alpha- race they want to win is at CD in May (if they leave w/ K-Mc)

4.  Hansen- working like a fiend on CD training track dirt (may just be a freak???)



Mile- Jeff Lifson

As many of you know, I live in Louisville--sorta gives me an unfair advantage to most in the ability to watch these BC horses train for a week or two at Churchill downs.   Also, as many of you have come to know sadly, I'm a lousy handicapper when it comes to reading the form and picking the winners of any race(most of you who ask me for picks at any given race day have learned this the hard way).  My edge is in picking the horses who are doing the best physically at the time of the race.  You can't do that for the random Thursday card at Belmont.  But you sure as shootin' can do it for BC.  So all that preamble leads to this in the BC Mile:

1)Courageous Cat (left) -it takes a pretty brave dude to pick against the Queen, Goldikova.   I'm not that brave normally, but CC is looking that good.
2)Goldikova--same course, same horse?   She looks the same and lord knows she's done the same training regime this week--basically nothing tough.   So why am I picking her second--she actually looks like she's carrying a little more flesh than last year.  She won it several years in a row looking like a skinny mini...I'll play against with the added girth.
3)Jeranimo--can you say peaking?   I can and he is this week.


 

 

Classic- Terry Finley

 

Win- To Honor and Serve- Three-year-old is coming into his own. Loved his win at Parx.
Place- Flat Out- Amazing how much he’s done 
with an almost two-year gap in his race record. Had a good year and like his chances.
Show-  Havre de Grace- Filly has run some big numbers. Legitimate shot to beat the boys. Think you have some more value with others though.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Good luck!
2
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BZelman (not verified)
Nov 5 2011 - 6:11am
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87176
/news-and-blog/blog/2011/11/03/west-point-team-member-breeders-cup-handicapping
3 pm on November 03, 2011

The West Point team joined together and took a crack at handicapping each of the Breeders’ Cup 2011 races. Some races are handicapped in more detail than others, but we thought you’d enjoyed the insight from each member of our team. You can view our bios by clicking here. Will Tom Bellhouse (and no the four-legged Bellhouse was not entered in the Breeders’ Cup) hit the tri in the Filly & Mare Turf? Will the three-year-old To Honor and Serve take the Classic for Bill Mott as predicted by Terry Finley?

EFinley
EFinley's picture
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West Point Team Member Breeders' Cup Handicapping

The Breeders’ Cup World Championships are right around the corner, and everyone is anticipating the season’s grand finale to be run at Churchill Downs on Nov. 4-5. It’s a fun time of year for us since a lot of the West Point Partners gather for a chance to see the best horses in the sport, both in actual competition and during morning training in the final days leading up to the big event.  


The Breeders’ Cup is every racing fan’s dream - a barrage of phenomenal talent. The top owners, trainers, and jockeys come into town to take a shot at two days of high-stakes competition. European runners ship in from overseas. North America’s top Thoroughbreds converge. Everywhere you turn, there are horses you’ve followed and come to respect all season.

With 15 races between Friday and Saturday, there’s something for everyone at the Breeders’ Cup. Turf, dirt, long, short, young, old - you name it, they’ve got it. Some races will draw more attention than others due to their impact on Eclipse Award honors, because we’ll see the winners competing in key races next year, or because great stars lead the lineup.

That’s definitely the case with three specific races - the Classic, the Mile, and the Juvenile. The Classic will determine Horse of the Year, the Mile features the reappearance of two turf stars, and the Juvenile could produce next year’s Kentucky Derby winner.

Let’s face it, Havre de Grace is no Zenyatta. But the drama provided by “Girl takes on the Boys” is something we love to see in racing, and it takes a sportsman to step up to the plate and run a filly against the game’s top males. After her domination over the boys in the Woodward, it’s a cinch that Havre de Grace would romp in the Ladies’ Classic, especially after the defection of horses like Blind Luck and Zazu. Putting her into the Classic is a bold move that indicates the confidence her connections have in her ability - and the racing world gets to benefit from a great show when she takes on the likes of Uncle Mo, Flat Out (a talented son of Flatter), Tizway, and Stay Thirsty.

If it weren’t for a couple of precocious females, Gio Ponti would have two Breeders’ Cup victories on his record. Think about it: second by one length to Zenyatta in the 2009 Breeders’ Cup Classic, second by 1 ¾ lengths to Goldikova in the 2010 edition of the Mile. But what’s great about this old-timer is that he hasn’t lost it - he won his second edition of the Shadwell Turf Mile last time out - and he’s sure to provide a thrilling challenge when the champion European turf mare makes a bid for an unprecedented fourth Breeders’ Cup Mile in a row.                

Esther Marr of The Blood-Horse wrote a nice piece about the Seabiscuit-like beginnings of Union Rags, a son of Dixie Union who is the likely favorite for the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile. This is a fascinating story about how even the smallest of breeders can have a chance at stardom, and along with all the pomp and circumstance, that’s definitely part of what the Breeders’ Cup is all about.     
 
Enjoy some recent Breeders' Cup memories below.
 
Terry 
 
 
 
Zenyatta winning 2009 Classic:
 

 

 

Goldikova winning 2010 Mile:

Read/Write
tfinley
Oct 25 2011 - 2:13pm
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87007
/news-and-blog/blog/2011/10/25/breeders-cup-is-rapidly-approaching
2 pm on October 25, 2011

The Breeders’ Cup World Championships are right around the corner, and everyone is anticipating the season’s grand finale to be run at Churchill Downs on Nov. 4-5. It’s a fun time of year for us since a lot of the West Point Partners gather for a chance to see the best horses in the sport, both in actual competition and during morning training in the final days leading up to the big event.  


The Breeders’ Cup is every racing fan’s dream - a barrage of phenomenal talent. The top owners, trainers, and jockeys come into town to take a shot at two days of high-stakes competition. European runners ship in from overseas. North America’s top Thoroughbreds converge. Everywhere you turn, there are horses you’ve followed and come to respect all season.
tfinley
tfinley's picture
43
Blog
Breeders' Cup is Rapidly Approaching

We put a few horses with Graham Motion last year and think very highly of him and his team. One thing’s for sure, we’re looking forward to continuing a successful relationship with the English native in the years to come.


He runs a first-rate operation out at Fair Hill in Elkton, Md., and the slower-paced style of training away from the racetrack can be very beneficial to a good number of horses.
Graham won the Kentucky Derby this year with Animal Kingdom and has been successful in getting horses to the Breeders' Cup World Championships this year, including Spinster Stakes (gr. I) winner Aruna, who will run either in the Ladies' Classic (gr. I) or the Filly & Mare Turf (gr. IT). We're sending our Shirocco (GER) colt and the Footstepsinthesand (GB) filly to him next spring.

Partners: Be sure to check out MYWPT for information on a Partner only conference call tomorrow. He’ll discuss the new yearlings and also share some Breeders’ Cup memories with us.

Here, Pia Catton of the Wall Street Journal does a great job profiling Graham’s operation:
 

 
-Terry 
2
Read/Write
CAccardo
Oct 29 2011 - 4:06pm
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86996
/news-and-blog/blog/2011/10/24/a-neat-profile-of-graham-motions-operation
10 am on October 24, 2011

We put a few horses with Graham Motion last year and think very highly of him and his team. One thing’s for sure, we’re looking forward to continuing a successful relationship with the English native in the years to come.


He runs a first-rate operation out at Fair Hill in Elkton, Md., and the slower-paced style of training away from the racetrack can be very beneficial to a good number of horses.
tfinley
tfinley's picture
43
Blog
A Neat Profile of Graham Motion's Operation

John Williams hails from Connecticut. He and his wife Cyndee have been West Point clients for several years. This August at Saratoga, as we walked out of the winners circle after a win with Sunrise Smarty, he asked if I had ever skydived. I told him I'd had nine jumps during my days as an Army Officer. With a big smirk on his face, John said, "I'm gonna skydive this fall - I'll send you photos."

I've been trying to do more blogging lately, so I sent John a note to ask if I could blog about the past year of his life. About twenty minutes later he sent me the following:
 
Hi Terry,
I had my first skydive today at 63 years old. What a rush!

This all started last year. Cyndee and I were out on our motorcycle and stopped at Skydive The Ranch. It was a beautiful spring day and I thought I could talk Cyndee into trying it. I acted as if I would fall out of a plane with no hesitation. When Cyndee said “no way” to a dive and the people there said I would have to book a jump two or three weeks ahead of time, we went on our way on our bike. I didn't really think more about it until Father’s day, when Cyndee went in with my daughter and her family and my son John to get me a gift certificate to skydive. A friend at work dives and mentioned to me to dive in the fall when the leaves turn, so we waited.

Then last summer came and I found out I had prostate cancer in a routine PSA exam that I happened to take. I thought I was in good shape, riding my bicycle 20 to 40 miles a week, so I put off taking physicals for a few years. It is important to watch the PSA reading at a low point as this cancer is slow-growing.  They say if you are going to get a cancer, prostate is the one to get. My PSA was high, so I had to act relatively fast and skydiving didn’t fit it the schedule.

After much research, I decided to enter the Lahey Clinic in Boston. My daughter Julie works there in cancer research. Julie told me about the great doctors that work there. That was Oct. 18th, 2010. I was out of the hospital the next day. It was only then that I mentioned to the nurses that I was from New York. I tried my best to get to Belmont on Oct. 20th to see Sunrise Smarty win, but it just wasn’t going to happen.

I will never forget that day. I was feeling kind of low, having gone through the hospital experience (I don’t even like to visit them), and I was hanging around in a hotel room in Boston. The phone rang; it was West Point Thoroughbreds calling me from the paddock at Belmont to let me know that Smarty was looking and feeling great. A few minutes later, he won. I sure felt a lot better after that.

Thanks to the care that Cyndee, my family and friends gave me, I recovered quickly.

I truly feel that being involved with horses helped me get through the rough times. Following their everyday training and races occupies your mind with good thoughts. Seeing them is a special bonus.

So now a year later, after the leaves turned again, I’m better again - and I finally fit that skydiving trip in. It was worth the wait.

John

The moral of the story? There are several. Don't forget your regular checkups, if you've ever dreamt of skydiving don't put it off any longer, remember the morale-boosting value of a good horse race... and make sure you enjoy the leaves this fall. John is on the left below. 

All the best,
Terry

 

 


 

2
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NReagan
Oct 23 2011 - 2:11pm
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86910
/news-and-blog/blog/2011/10/21/skydiving-and-horse-racing-go-hand-in-hand
11 am on October 21, 2011

John Williams hails from Connecticut. He and his wife Cyndee have been West Point clients for several years. This August at Saratoga, as we walked out of the winners circle after a win with Sunrise Smarty, he asked if I had ever skydived. I told him I'd had nine jumps during my days as an Army Officer. With a big smirk on his face, John said, "I'm gonna skydive this fall - I'll send you photos."

I've been trying to do more blogging lately, so I sent John a note to ask if I could blog about the past year of his life. About twenty minutes later he sent me the following:
tfinley
tfinley's picture
43
Blog
Skydiving and Horse Racing go Hand-in-Hand

We all know the visuals we see and experience around the horses and visiting the track are part of racing's magic.

Here's a photo gallery that will knock your socks off. Barbara Livingston - a friend of West Point for many years - is one of the world's leading equine photographers. In this gallery, she chronicles a month at Saratoga in photos. Took me five minutes to view - and it's really intriguing.
 
About halfway down the gallery, you'll see a unique photo of our own King Congie in the middle of his only start at Saratoga.
 
Enjoy.
 
Terry 
 
P.S. Here's the direct link if you want to share with a friend:
 
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tfinley
Feb 27 2012 - 12:01pm
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86908
/news-and-blog/blog/2011/10/20/pictures-are-worth-a-thousand-words-in-the-racehorse-industry
8 am on October 20, 2011

We all know the visuals we see and experience around the horses and visiting the track are part of racing's magic.

Here's a photo gallery that will knock your socks off. Barbara Livingston - a friend of West Point for many years - is one of the world's leading equine photographers. In this gallery, she chronicles a month at Saratoga in photos. Took me five minutes to view - and it's really intriguing.
tfinley
tfinley's picture
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Pictures Are Worth A Thousand Words in the Racehorse Industry

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