Three Reasons to Own a New York Bred Racehorse in 2012 with a Racing Partnership / Wednesday, December 28, 2011

The New York-bred program is positioning itself as arguably the best state-bred racing program in the industry today. Racing on the New York Racing Association’s circuit (Aqueduct, Belmont, and Saratoga) has been reinvigorated by the income received from the newly-opened VLT casino at Aqueduct. Breeders are sending better and better mares to the Empire State. Promising young stallions like Here Comes Ben and Justenuffhumor are heading to farms there at just the right time.

The New York-bred program is positioning itself as arguably the best state-bred racing program in the industry today. Racing on the New York Racing Association’s circuit (Aqueduct, Belmont, and Saratoga) has been reinvigorated by the income received from the newly-opened VLT casino at Aqueduct. Breeders are sending better and better mares to the Empire State. Promising young stallions like Here Comes Ben and Justenuffhumor are heading to farms there at just the right time.

West Point Thoroughbreds’ New York circuit racing partnerships have excelled with NY-breds over the years with horses like Mr. Fantasy and Rereadthefootnotes donning the black and gold. We expect to have a few members of our 2-year-old class of 2012 hailing from New York. Below are three reasons why racing a New York-bred racehorse could be advantageous to Thoroughbred owners in New York racing syndicates:

1. Purse Hikes Looming
Purses at New York Racing Association tracks are projected to grow from the current $103 million a year to over $140 million. Based on projections, the New York Thoroughbred breeding fund could be valued at $10 million by 2014. It’s a great time to compete on the NYRA circuit.

2. Restricted Races
With a good NY-bred in the barn, you’ve got a shot to be a big fish in a small pond when running in races restricted to horses bred in the state. Less than 800 of over 23,000 live foals of 2011 were NY-breds.

3. Did We Mention Purses?
Beginning January 1st, NY-bred maiden special weights and allowances have purses upwards of $50,000. State-bred restricted stakes carry purses of $75,000. If a NY-bred competes and excels against open company, they’re eligible for lucrative bonuses. A state-bred in an open maiden special weight runs for a purse over $71,000. A state-bred in an open first level allowance race runs for over $80,000. Good stuff, eh? 

 

NY-bred Mr. Fantasy winning the 2009 Withers Stakes (G3) at Aqueduct:

 

NY-bred Rereadthefootnotes winning the 2010 Hollie Hughes Stakes:



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